Here is your horoscope for July 17, 2018

first_imgARIESYou are a strong force to be reckoned with in any situation. You take on impossible tasks and change things around in a positive direction. You have the support you need to achieve success with dynamic ideas. You make moves in relationships to bring harmony. Lucky number 6. Colour orange. TAURUSYou are strong and impulsive like The Prince of Swords while taking personal and professional decisions. Relationships are healing and relaxing. You are just with family, staff and associates and can expect their support. Dont allow old fears to get you. Lucky number 17. Colour yellow. GEMINIRelax, take one step at a time and think positively. You are divided as you cope with two separate issues that demand your time and attention. You can manifest health problems due to stress and anxiety. A personal relationship is exciting. Celebrate life today! Lucky number 8. Colour white. CANCERYou no longer hide feelings but are ready and available to be healed while also helping others to feel healthy and whole. Children and family are supportive. Love and friendship bring back harmony in relationships. Be open to the healing touch of existence. Lucky number 9. Colour turquoise. LEOYou are likely to complete projects and tie up loose ends. Relationships seem to be flowering into commitments as special feelings are shared. Opportunities for expansion appear on the horizon. Your personality attracts some important and interesting people. Lucky number 4. Colour green. VIRGOYou express frank opinions at work and feelings in relationships. Beware of a person who takes advantage of you. Recovery from any sickness is ensured. Sudden and unexpected happenings cannot be ruled out. You share memorable moments with a soul mate. Lucky number 19. Colour yellow.advertisement LIBRAYou are ready to take on strenuous work in projects. You are not manipulated by others or lose clarity. You realize the deep emotional content in a relationship, which appears casual on the surface. Express your appreciation and gratitude. Trust intuition. Lucky number 9. Colour blue. SCORPIOYou have a tremendous sense of exhilaration when taking a quantum leap into unknown professional and personal situations. You are quick to respond and enthusiastic about new opportunities. You tend to be sensitive and easily hurt in relationships, be aware. Lucky number 5. Colour blue. SAGITTARIUSEnergy feels depleted as you deal with obstacles at work and difficulties in relationships. A valiant attempt to achieve success is rewarded finally. Take time off to rejuvenate your energy and health with fitness routines. Conserve resources and finances. Lucky number 7. Colour green. CAPRICORNYou can be unaware of your partner’s feelings, be caring despite your commitment to work and involvement in others affairs. You find it hard to make decisions as you analyze and think of pros and cons endlessly. Interest in media or sport is satisfying. Lucky number 5. Colour blue. AQUARIUSRather than getting frustrated by pushing situations and people towards change, allow space and time to transform them. This is not a good time to take chances or indulge in speculation. Health and finances must be watched. Yoga and meditation is elevating. Lucky number 5. Colour pink. PISCESBe flexible about plans and take things in your stride. Confrontations can only lead to further conflict. Your lightness and sense of humour take you smoothly through blocks and difficulties. Your personal relationships are rejuvenated with love and energy. Lucky number 5. Colour brown.last_img read more

8 days agoGang arrested over player burglaries; Thomas Partey recovers Champions League medal

first_imgGang arrested over player burglaries; Thomas Partey recovers Champions League medalby Carlos Volcano8 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveThe gang that pulled off a series of burglaries against LaLiga footballers has been caught and arrested.Eldiario.es reports four people have been arrested connected to raids on homes of players of Real Madrid and Atletico. The operation was carried out between the cities of Madrid and Toledo, where the alleged criminals were arrested. Law enforcement have managed to recover some valuables that were taken from the homes of the players. Among the jewels and other belongings, the Champions League runners-up medal of Thomas Partey was found. The Atletico Madrid midfielder’s home was raided earlier this month, while he was in Russia for the European match against Lokmotiv Moscow.Casemiro, Isco, Zinedine Zidane and Alvaro Morata were some of those in Madrid who were victims of robberies. About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Colin Cowherd’s CFP Foursome Includes 2 Big Ten Teams But Not Alabama

first_imgColin Cowherd talking College Football on The Heard.colin cowherd says nebraska beats iowaFox Sports’ Colin Cowherd isn’t shy about voicing his opinion on many topics, including the College Football Playoff.  Yesterday, Cowherd tweeted that he disagreed with one-loss Alabama getting into the playoff over one-loss Ohio State, due to what he perceives a difference in strength between the SEC and Big Ten. Tonight, Cowherd revealed his current CFP foursome, and he lived up to his opinion from yesterday. Alabama is nowhere to be found among the four teams, while Michigan State and Ohio State are in the group. Turned in my playoff top 4 to @FOXSports. 1.Clemson 2. Oklahoma 3. Michigan St 4. Ohio State. SEC is an overrated mess. Sorry Bama.— Colin Cowherd (@ColinCowherd) November 30, 2015Expect Cowherd’s email and Twitter mentions to be engulfed with angry Tide fans starting 20 minutes ago. As good as the Buckeyes are, Alabama’s resume is impressive. Yes, the Tide lost to 9-3 Ole Miss and have three “cupcake” wins, but their other eight victories are against teams with .500 records or better. Their defensive front seven is scary and Derrick Henry is a legit Heisman candidate. They belong in the CFP.last_img read more

Nunavut MP Aglukkaq silent as Franklin fracas claims Pulitizer prize winning journalist

first_img(From L to R: Ryan Harris, Parks Canada, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq at the Franklin Expedition announcement. Photo: PMO)Kent DriscollAPTN National NewsIQALUIT — Canada’s MP for Nunavut and Minister of Environment is remaining silent after accusations surfaced that the federal government meddled in the story around how two lost ships in the Franklin expedition were discovered.On Monday, Toronto Star photojournalist, and Pulitzer prize winning reporter Paul Watson quit, stating that it was because the paper wouldn’t let him investigate the story of the scientists who discovered the HMS Erebus last summer.“I had traction on a story, and began reporting, to try to finish it, and I was ordered to stop,” Watson told APTN in an interview Wednesday. “It is the first time I’ve been asked to stop working on a story before I’ve even written it. At a meeting with management in Vancouver, I explicitly asked, ‘Yes or no, will you let me finish this story?’ I was told by the Star’s editor Michael Cooke ‘We’re not interested in that story.’ That was a kill order, and I quit.”The Toronto Star denies the allegations.In an article published in the paper Wednesday, publisher Jim Cruikshank wrote to staff stating the accusations are false.“Let me publicly deny this extremely odd idea. There is no truth whatever to the suggestion.” He went on to describe the conflict as “fundamentally a personal matter.”Watson received the Pulitzer prize in 1994 for spot news photography for photos he took for The Star of the 1994 war in Somalia.Most recently, he has been covering Arctic issues for The Star, Canada’s largest daily newspaper.Watson said he had to go public, because the scientists were frightened.“They’re frightened of losing their jobs. I was shocked at how far widespread that fear is,” he said. “Hard working people, experts in their field, who are afraid to speak the truth, because they fear that they will be slapped down and perhaps lose their jobs over it,” said Watson.Paul Watson, Author Photo: Toronto StarAccording to Watson, John Geiger, CEO of the Royal Canadian Geographic Society, who just received the new Polar Medal in Whitehorse Wednesday, is one of the reasons scientists are upset.He said according to scientists, Geiger only joined the team a year before the discovery of the Franklin ships, and doesn’t deserve the award.“I don’t know anything about motive, and I won’t allege anything about motive. But I do know that it doesn’t smell right. It was stated to me as a fact, on more than one occasion, that John Geiger, who’s the former head of the Globe and Mail editorial board was a former colleague of a few of us here (at the Toronto Star) an editor told me. I had a reasonable suspicion that he might have access to my reporting,” said Watson.“Four people as I understand it received that (Polar) medal. I think, clearly, that three of them are important to the discovery of HMS Erebus. They deserve that medal … I challenge anyone, as my sources have, to find evidence that John Geiger had any direct role in the discovery of that ship. Or did anything else that would warrant a medal from the Governor-General, awarded on behalf of the Queen,”APTN National News contacted Geiger and the Royal Canadian Geographic Society for comment but calls were not returned.Watson told APTN he also tried to contact Geiger.“My first attempt to contact Geiger was seven weeks ago yesterday,” said Watson. “I’ve contacted members of his staff, including communications director. I’ve spoken to her on the phone. I’ve also sent more than one email. I’ve contacted his wife, who was hired as Special Sections editor at The Star not long ago. She won’t reply either,” said Watson.Watson isn’t the only person who thinks something doesn’t “smell right” about the decision to give so much credit to Geiger and his team.Canadian businessman Jim Basillie, chair of Arctic Research Foundation, funded much of the research to find the lost ships.Basille wrote Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq in April of this year, dismayed at the way media coverage had turned out.In the letter, Basillie wrote: “I am concerned that the documentary contains information that runs contrary to the planning meeting we held in your office on June 9th, 2014 and filmed for the Prime Minister’s on-line news channel. The narrative, as currently presented, attempts to minimize the role of the Government and its respective agencies and private partners. It also creates new and exaggerated narratives for the exclusive benefit of the Royal Canadian Geographic Society and its own partners. I am raising my concerns with you now because I understand that the Government of Canada has final approval of the content of this documentary and subsequent communications outputs”Arctic Research Foundation letterDownload (PDF, Unknown)The documentary Basillie is referring to is the CBC Nature of Things episode “Franklin’s Lost Ships”.APTN contacted Basillie to find out which officials told him the federal government had final edit of the documentary.According to Basillie’s assistant, Karen Paquette, “Mr. Balsillie has no comment at this time. He has communicated his concerns about the Franklin project (as well as ideas for Northern communities to benefit from the project) to relevant partners directly.”The producer of the Nature of Things episode denies the allegation.APTN contacted producer Andrew Gregg about the accusations and whether the federal government had final edit on his work.“Not at all. Parks Canada wanted to see the doc before it went to air, but we were doing this in conjunction with CBC and there is a very definite policy at CBC, that you do not allow pre-screens of the doc,” said Andrew Gregg.APTN also contacted Nunavut MP and Minister of Environment Leona Aglukkaq, to ask who nominated Geiger for the award, whether government scientists were being muzzled, and if Basillie had been given assurances that the documentary was subject to government approval prior to airing.Aglukkaq did not [email protected] @kentdriscolllast_img read more

FIFA’s Club World Cup: 174 players went through anti-doping checks

first_imgAgadir – 174 players from the participating teams in the FIFA Club World Cup Morocco 2013 underwent unannounced blood and urine tests between 1 November and 10 December with the aim of fighting doping in football.“A biological profile of each player will be established from the hematological parameters of his blood, as well as the steroid profile of his urine,” FIFA said.FIFA is aiming to continue with the new anti-doping strategy in the future, especially in the upcoming World Cup that is set to take place in Brazil next summer. “This method is set to become the standard course of action in the future in the detection of performance-enhancing substances.”FIFA added that two players per team will be similarly tested at random after each game.© Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributedlast_img read more

Egypt ban could push Hamas into new fight with Israel

first_imgGaza City (Palestinian Territories) — An Egyptian court ban on Hamas activities could push the increasingly isolated Palestinian Islamist movement into another battle with Israel, analysts say.The latest move marked a further deterioration in ties between Egypt and Hamas, which has close links to the Muslim Brotherhood of deposed Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi and is now the target of a sweeping crackdown by the military-installed government.Since Morsi’s overthrow, the Egyptian authorities have destroyed hundreds of tunnels along the border with the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip which had been used to bring in fuel and construction materials, as well as weapons and ammunition. The loss of the tunnels has deepened the economic crisis in Gaza, which has been under an Israeli blockade since 2006, and a senior Hamas official warned the court’s move could prompt a new confrontation with Israel.“The situation between Egypt and Hamas has reached the point of no return,” said Mukhaimar Abu Saada, political science professor at Gaza’s Al-Azhar University.“For Hamas, the choices are extremely limited: reconciliation with (Western-backed Palestinian) president Mahmud Abbas, or open confrontation with Israel to embarrass Egypt and win the sympathy of the Arab world,” he said.“The latter option would be costly and risky.”On Tuesday, the Egyptian court banned Hamas from operating in the country and moved to seize its assets after accusing it of colluding with the Muslim Brotherhood to carry out attacks.Gazans celebrated in the streets when Morsi became Egypt’s first freely elected leader in June 2012, a year and a half after Hosni Mubarak was toppled by an Arab Spring uprising.But last year, the Egyptian army overthrew Morsi following massive protests against his divisive rule and has since designated the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organisation.The destruction of the border tunnels is costing Gaza $230 million (170 million euros) a month, Hamas says. Government workers say they have not been paid in four months.– Ruling ‘opens door’ to hostilities –Bassem Naim, an adviser to Hamas prime minister Ismail Haniya, told AFP the court ruling was “shocking”, and said he hoped it would not translate into “restrictions on people’s movement”.Egypt has severely restricted access through the border town of Rafah — Gaza’s only gate to the world that is not controlled by Israel — ostensibly for security reasons.Ezzat al-Rishq, a Hamas official close to the movement’s exiled leader Khaled Meshaal, said the ruling “will open the door to new (Israeli) aggression and war against Gaza”.A fragile Egypt-mediated ceasefire between Hamas and Israel that ended a bloody eight-day conflict in November 2012 has brought more than a year of relative calm, with Hamas policing its borders to prevent rocket fire by rogue militants.Gaza-based political analyst Hani Habib downplayed the court ruling as “a formality which will have little additional impact,” saying border restrictions are nothing new and that Hamas has no offices or major assets in Egypt.But Adnan Abu Amr, a politics professor at Gaza’s Ummah University, said: “A final, definitive break between Egypt and Hamas would mean increased pressure on Gaza, meaning that it could blow up in Egypt or Israel’s faces.”Political analyst Naji Sharab said the best option for Hamas would be to reconcile with Abbas’s Fatah party, its Palestinian rival based in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.But that would require Hamas to moderate its core belief that Israel must be destroyed and accept US-brokered peace negotiations — which it has staunchly refused to do.Hamas and Fatah, which dominates the Western-backed Palestinian Authority, signed a 2011 reconciliation agreement in Cairo that was meant to heal divisions that boiled over when Hamas seized Gaza in 2007.last_img read more

The NFL Should Let 14 Teams In The Playoffs Instead Of Just

The NFL playoffs begin Saturday, and if recent reports are any indication, this season could mark the end of the 12-team postseason era. In March, the league will vote on whether to expand its tournament field to 14 teams for the 2015 season — after which the floodgates may open for further expansion in subsequent seasons.This is not necessarily a bad thing. The NFL playoffs are a TV ratings bonanza, and it doesn’t seem as though our appetite for football is waning (despite a trying year off the field). Plus, teams such as the Philadelphia Eagles, Buffalo Bills and Houston Texans — all of which missed the playoffs this season despite winning records — make a case for creating more playoff spots. (And the 7-8-1 Carolina Panthers hosting a home playoff game makes the case for re-seeding the field.)But which expanded format is best? As I’ve done in the past, I’ll take the perspective that the best format is the one that sees the most deserving team win the most often, using a Monte Carlo simulation to test playoff fields of various sizes.More specifically, I generated random preseason Elo ratings for every team (based on the historical distribution of real-life preseason Elo ratings) and simulated the real-life 2014 regular season schedule 1,000 times — an exercise similar to that performed by Doug Drinen in this classic post at the Pro-Football-Reference.com blog. For each of those simulations, I tracked the regular season standings, seeding the teams within each conference using simulated point differential as the tiebreaker.The preseason ratings represent the starting talent levels for every team, but they can go up or down depending on the simulated game outcomes, in accordance with the Elo formula. For instance, a team assigned an initial Elo below the league-average mark of 1500 could tear off an improbably great regular season and finish above 1700. That would be used as the team’s strength rating going into the postseason.For potential expanded fields of 14, 16, 20, and 32 teams, I tracked how often the most talented preseason and end-of-regular-season Elo team won the Super Bowl, as well as the average preseason and pre-playoff Elo ratings (and rankings) of the simulated Super Bowl champs. For comparison, I also ran this test for contracted fields of 2, 4, and 8 teams, as well as the current 12-team setup.Here’s a little more to help decipher that chart. When the playoffs contained just 2 teams, the average simulated Super Bowl winner had an Elo of 1565.3 before the season, which gave it an average ranking of 9.2 among the NFL’s 32 teams. Also, 12.8 percent of those Super Bowl winners were ranked No. 1 in the preseason. After the regular season was simulated, those teams averaged an Elo rating of 1690.1, with an average ranking of 2.5 within the league, and they led the league in post-regular season Elo 44.7 percent of the time. Finally, following the Super Bowl the average winner from our two-team-playoff universe had an Elo rating of 1711.6.Comparing those categories across all formats, the irony is that a BCS-style two-team playoff produces the most talented champion from the perspective of both preseason and end-of-regular-season Elo ratings. But since that’s clearly neither realistic nor desirable, it appears the 14-team bracket is the superior option. On average, it yields the most talented team of any expanded format, and enables that team to win the Super Bowl with quite a bit more frequency — perhaps due to first-round byes only being given to the top seed in each conference.Interestingly, a 14-team bracket also yields the best average post-Super Bowl rating for the champ among any format tested, expanded or not. (Granting that the current 12-team setup sees the better regular-season team win more often.) Based on this research, then, a 14-team playoff seems to strike the best balance between letting teams settle things on the field and putting the most deserving teams in a position to succeed. read more

Buckeye football to kick off 2010 season with Thursday night game

Ohio State will open its 2010 regular season against Marshall on Thursday, Sept. 2, the OSU athletic department confirmed shortly after a source reported the story to The Lantern.“This change to a Thursday night opener offers a number of positives for Ohio State,” Ohio State associate vice-president and director of athletics Gene Smith said through a press release. “Summer quarter classes end the week before, so there will be minimal campus impact on students, faculty and staff that day.The scheduling decision will provide the Buckeyes two extra days to prepare for their most daunting non-conference opponent, Miami (Fla.), who they will play Sept. 11.“Along with providing maximum national exposure for our Rose Bowl champions, this unique starting date and time allows our team and fans to escape the heat of the day, and breaks up a string of four consecutive Saturday home games to start the season,” Smith said. “It will allow fans to enjoy other events throughout the Labor Day weekend. We see it as a treat for Buckeye fans and an exciting way to open the 2010 campaign.”Information regarding parking and transportation for the night game will be determined at a later date, according to the press release.The Buckeyes haven’t played a mid-week game during the regular season since 1997, when they beat Wyoming 24-10 in their season opener.Coach Jim Tressel expressed his excitement in kicking off the season under the lights.“The Thursday night before Labor Day is a great night to play,” Tressel said. “To be one of the first games that kicks off the 2010 season will be exciting. The Buckeyes and the Thundering Herd will both be veteran teams, and it will be a fun night in the Horseshoe. We cannot wait to tee it up.” read more

Jerry Lucas Small town boy Big Ten Icon

Sunset Park, located on Bellemonte Street in Middletown, Ohio, was once the Rucker Park of the Midwest — when summertime rolled around, professional and collegiate basketball players alike would swarm the courts, hoping to play a game of pickup basketball against the best players in the area. One summer, former University of Dayton senior and captain Johnny Horan was matched up against a man named Jerry Lucas. Lucas absolutely destroyed him, embarrassing him on both ends of the court. Horan, who had never heard of Lucas, went around asking the other players which college Lucas attended. He was impressed with what he saw, and he wanted to find out where Lucas went to school so that he might follow the young man’s career. “He was told that Lucas was a sophomore, so he asked, ‘What college does he go to?’ and he was told, ‘Well, he’s a sophomore in high school. He’s a 10th-grader,’” said Lee Caryer, Buckeye basketball historian and author of “The Golden Age of Ohio State Basketball.” Throughout his life, Lucas has been a step ahead of the competition. In grade school, Lucas said, his coursework bored him. “When I got to school, I realized I wasn’t being taught how to learn,” Lucas said. “In school they use repetition. Everybody has forever, and I realized that this is no fun. There has to be an easier way.” Lucas began to experiment with different learning methods, creating a series of mental games that would help to make the material tangible and easier to learn. “I was always an excellent student — I was a 4.0 student at Ohio State, and my learning systems made it easy for me to learn,” Lucas said. “By the time I got through high school and into college, learning was very simple and easy for me.” At 6-foot-8, Lucas wasn’t always the biggest man on the court. He wasn’t the most athletic or the fastest. He was, however, a tireless worker. “Nobody ever worked harder than I did at basketball, or for longer hours,” Lucas said. Blessed with a gifted mind, Lucas relied on both his intelligence and his unrelenting work ethic to become a better basketball player. Throughout most of his high school career, it seemed Lucas might never lose a game. Middletown High School went undefeated for Lucas’ first three seasons, and he became a hot commodity. “Jerry Lucas was recruited harder than anyone, with the possible exception of Wilt Chamberlain up to that point,” Caryer said. Lucas’ media coverage was similar to that of Akron, Ohio’s LeBron James when he played at St. Vincent-St. Mary High School. But Lucas shied away from the spotlight. “Throughout my high-school career, I didn’t want to be bothered by recruiters,” Lucas said. “I wasn’t interested; I just wanted to be a normal person who enjoyed my life and enjoyed my friends.” When the time came to decide on a college, Lucas made only one visit. The summer after his senior season, when he lost his last high-school game to Columbus North High School, he chose to study at OSU. “I liked the atmosphere there, and I was primarily interested in an education,” Lucas said. “I went on an academic scholarship and not a sports scholarship. Everything about Ohio State was very attractive to me, and it seemed like the best situation.” Once Lucas committed to play for the Buckeyes, other high school basketball stars in Ohio began to follow his lead, including local standout Mel Nowell and Bridgeport’s John Havlicek. “Before they got to campus, there was this buzz,” Caryer said. “Then, when they were freshmen, the story about people leaving and missing the varsity games because they wanted to see the freshmen play — that was very true.” Lucas said the freshmen made a habit of beating the varsity team in practice. Dick Furry, then-junior and future co-captain of the varsity squad, remembers things a little differently. “Some of those stories got blown out of proportion,” Furry said. “I think one story that was widely circulated was that they beat us all the time. And basically, if I remember right, we broke even. I think it was about 50-50.” Regardless, Furry said the team was “doggone happy” when Lucas committed to OSU. When he joined the varsity team his sophomore year, 1959-60, Lucas became the centerpiece on the offensive end. “Our offense revolved around Lucas, and that was the best thing for the team,” said John Havlicek, former Buckeye and Celtic Hall of Famer. “For the way we wanted to play, we used him as the focal point.” That year, the Buckeyes won the National Championship Game against the University of California, 75-55. The team played a nearly impeccable first half, making 15 of its first 16 shots. Lucas averaged 26.3 points and 16.4 rebounds per game that season, and he received the tournament’s Most Outstanding Player award. That summer, Lucas traveled to Rome and suited up for the 1960 U.S. Olympic basketball team. The team’s roster was stacked, featuring future Hall of Famers Jerry West and Oscar Robertson. “That’s a real honor for any athlete, in my opinion; to have the opportunity to represent his country is just incredible,” Lucas said. “As I look back, it was one of the utmost highlights of my entire basketball career.” It was the last championship Lucas won for a number of years. His junior season, the Buckeyes strolled into the National Championship Game undefeated, but fell to Cincinnati, 70-65. “There’s no doubt that our team was better,” Lucas said. “Unfortunately we didn’t play as well as we had been playing. Cincinnati played better, and they beat us.” Cincinnati went on to beat OSU again at the end of Lucas’ senior season, but the first loss still haunts him. “That first Cincinnati loss is the most devastating loss I’ve ever had in my life,” Lucas said. “It’s something that you believe you have a chance of winning — you shoot for it all year, and then when it’s taken away from you, it’s not a pleasant memory in anybody’s life.” The NBA’s defunct Cincinnati Royals drafted Lucas and offered him a contract of $30,000. George Steinbrenner, the late New York Yankees owner who at one time owned the American Basketball League’s Cleveland Pipers, had other ideas. “He offered me $40,000 a year, so I signed with him,” Lucas said. “I never got a nickel from him, nor did I ever play a game in the ABL, because the league folded prior to that season beginning.” Lucas eventually signed with the Royals. For the better half of a decade, he witnessed the Boston Celtics perennially eliminate his team from championship contention. Legendary center Bill Russell and former Buckeye teammate Havlicek led the Celtics. It wasn’t until Lucas became a member of the New York Knicks that he won an NBA championship, reaching the top of the mountain in 1973. For his professional career, he averaged 17.0 points and 15.6 rebounds per game. He played in seven All-Star games and was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1979. Lucas’ list of awards and achievements includes being the only college player to lead the nation in rebounding and field goal percentage for three straight years, and the first player in history to win a championship at every level of competition, according to his official website. “I would argue to this day that Lucas was one of the top five college players of all time,” said Bob Ryan, longtime Boston Globe contributor and occasional ESPN “Around the Horn” panelist. “Lucas was a great rebounder and an extraordinary player.” Lucas lives near San Luis Obispo, Calif. He has written more than 70 books that aim to help others by teaching memory education techniques, and he’s working on a website he refers to as the “culmination of his life’s work.” “I’m in the process right now of creating a very unique educational website, which will be called ‘Dr. M’s Universe,’” Lucas said. “And I know that when America — and the world, as far as that’s concerned, because it will be on the World Wide Web — when they have an opportunity to experience it, it will change millions and millions of lives.” Sharing his intellectual gifts with others makes perfect sense, given he took pride in his selfless play on the court, and team achievements were always more important to him than individual honors. Of the championships he won at four levels, one in particular stood out to him. “The Ohio State team was more special than the others because I was with that group for a longer period,” Lucas said. “The core of that group came in as freshmen, so we were together for a long time, and we developed great, lifelong friendships that continue to this day. So, that was uniquely special for all of us.” This article has been revised to reflect the following correction: Correction: Jan. 24, 2011 An earlier version of this story stated that Oscar Robertson was on the University of Cincinnati men’s basketball team that beat Ohio State in the 1961 National Championship Game. Robertson was drafted by the Cincinnati Royals in 1960 and was not on the University of Cincinnati team in 1961. read more

Womens Basketball Ohio State guard Asia Doss to miss Big Ten championship

Ohio State senior guard Asia Doss has a walking boot on and will not play in the Big Ten championship game against Maryland on March 4, 2018. Credit: Colin Hass-Hill | Sports EditorINDIANAPOLIS — The Ohio State women’s basketball team advanced to the Big Ten tournament championship game without senior guard Asia Doss, and now it will be forced to take on Maryland in the title game without her.Doss, who suffered a sprained ankle in the last game of the regular season, will miss her third game in a row Sunday night. She had never previously missed a game, having played 134 in a row.After win against Rutgers in the quarterfinals, Doss said she felt 95 percent healthy, but was being held out for precautionary reasons. McGuff said the team held her out to ensure she is ready for the NCAA tournament.In Doss’ place, senior forward Alexa Hart picked up her first two starts of the season in wins against Rutgers and Minnesota. She had 10 points and six rebounds in the quarterfinals against the Scarlet Knights and picked up eight points and six rebounds in the semifinals win versus the Golden Gophers.McGuff said he felt the loss of Doss hurt the Buckeyes’ transition defense in the win against Minnesota. The Golden Gophers racked up 19 fast-break points.Doss averages eight points and 2.7 rebounds per game. She shoots 33.6 percent from the field and has hit just 26.3 percent of her 3-point attempts. read more