Walking Upright Was a Birth Defect

first_imgWhat’s so big about walking upright?  A single birth defect in a human ancestor 21 million years ago could have made it all possible, according to Dr. Aaron Filler (Cedars Sinai Medical Center), a specialist in the spine.    According to EurekAlert, he proposes that in the “hominiform hominoid” Morotopithecus, a sibling was born with its horizontal septum transposed behind the lumbar region of the spine.  This would have made its normal knuckle-walking gait inefficient.  The child must have stood upright for relief.  “Any mammal with this set of changes would only be comfortable standing upright,” he said.  “I would envision this malformed young hominiform – the first true ancestral human – as standing upright from a young age while its siblings walked around on all fours.”According to the article, this idea “greatly demotes the importance of the bipedalism of Australopithecus species such as Lucy,” because walking upright was already old hat by then.  In fact, the septum pattern found in his assumed upright-walking hominoids is as old as some invertebrates.  Filler seems to be proposing upright posture not for any particular functional reason but as a mistake.  “From an embryological point of view,” he remarked, “what took place is literally breathtaking.”So the Ugly Duckling of an early hominoid family found a sweetheart with the same birth defect and the two lived happily ever after, having lots of children that became medical doctors and philosophers.  He’s right; for a story devoid of sense or evidence, this one is literally breathtaking.  Better re-read the 11/18/2004 entry to recall all the other birth defects Dr. Filler forgot to fill out.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast, May 21, 2019

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The forecast is less friendly this morning for parts of the state, as we are having to increase moisture potential. Here in the short term today, there is not much change. Most of Ohio will turn out partly sunny, but will remain cool with strong north flow. We will keep an eye out in NW Ohio for a renegade shower or two, trying to push in toward midday and early afternoon out of Indiana. Tomorrow we continue to watch as the offshoot moisture from a cold front to our west works in. However, we are leaving moisture totals along, with a clouds and a few scattered showers. Rain totals will be no more than .25″ and generally will be a few hundredths to a tenth, with 60% coverage (mostly north of I-70). Temps will be significantly warmer. Our first tweak of the forecast is to add more moisture for Thursday, as lingering showers hold across a large part of Ohio. We can see additional rains of a few hundredths to half an inch with coverage at 70%. Friday will turn dry again, but will stay warm. Unfortunately, the weekend looks more active. We had been looking for rain and thunderstorms on 1 day out of the 3 day holiday weekend…now we are raising that to 3 out of 3 days. Showers and a few thunderstorms can be around each day Saturday through Memorial Day Monday. Coverage each day will be from 50-60%, but combined for the 3 day period we should see coverage closer to 80%. Combined rain totals will be from .25″-1″, with the potential for .1″-.4″ each day. Stronger thunderstorms should stay well off to the west and south.  The map at right shows cumulative rain potential through Memorial Day next Monday We get a dry day for next Tuesday, the 28th, as our next system is pushing back just a bit. Scattered showers arrive Wednesday the 29th, mostly from I-70 north, but they look less intense. For now, we are pulling moisture back to .25” or less with coverage at 75%. Dry to finish the 10 day window and start the extended 11-16 day period next Thursday and Friday (30th & 31st). Sun on the first will give way to clouds and we see rain arriving that night. That rain continues into June 2nd with combined moisture totals of .25”-1” and coverage at 80%. We are projecting 3 dry days behind that to finish the extended period for Monday the 3rd through Wednesday the 5th. There could be another system on the way for the 6th.last_img read more

New disaster funding from Ohio NRCS to plant cover crops on damaged acreage

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Extreme weather conditions like the recent excessive rains and tornadoes have negatively impacted Ohio farmers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service will invest $4 million to help Ohio agricultural producers recover.  Technical and financial assistance is now available to producers who were unable to plant their crops, or who have experienced crop loss due to flooded or wet fields. This sign-up is an opportunity for farmers to plant a cover crop.“NRCS can be a valuable partner to help Ohio landowners with their agricultural recovery effort,” said State Conservationist Terry Cosby for NRCS in Ohio. “This special sign-up encourages farmers to plant cover crops to improve water quality and soil health, prevent soil erosion, and suppress weeds on areas not planted to crops.”NRCS will utilize the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for this special disaster recovery sign-up.  EQIP is a voluntary conservation program that helps agricultural producers protect the environment while promoting agricultural production.Cover crops provide an alternative to fields going fallow and remaining uncovered.  Cover crops also improve soil vitality by adding nutrients and organic matter. Many fields that are saturated for a long period of time face a loss of soil organisms. Cover crop roots reestablish soil health and create pathways for air and water to move through the soil, which is key to restoring it.There are significant changes with cover crops and we want producers to be successful in their 2020 planting year.  Educational cover crop workshops and field days are readily available throughout Ohio to learn more.  Additional information is also available on the NRCS website and farmers.gov/prevented-planting.Landowners should coordinate with other USDA farm agencies when participating in related programs.  It is a producer’s responsibility to work directly with their insurance agent and RMA to ensure they understand their policy.To apply for this special EQIP opportunity, visit your local USDA Service Center.  Applications will be accepted beginning July 1, 2019 until funding is exhausted.last_img read more