Ryan names experienced England Sevens squad

first_img england Sevens coach Ben RyanEngland Sevens have named an experienced squad, including the majority of the players who lifted the first silverware of the 2010-11 season, for the start of the HSBC Sevens World Series in Australia.Eight of the 2010 Dubai title winners are in the 12-man group heading for the new opening venue of the expanded global event on the Gold Coast on November 25-26.The squad is strengthened by new signings Rob Vickerman and Chris Brightwell, who have joined from Aviva Premiership outfits Newcastle Falcons and Sale Sharks respectively.Also called up are wing Nick Royle, awarded a full-time contract after scoring 35 tries in this summer’s four FIRA-AER European Grand Prix tournaments, and former England Under 20 wing Marcus Watson from Saracens, who made his international sevens debut in Adelaide this year.Head coach Ben Ryan also welcomes back Isoa Damudamu (British Army) – out of action since last February’s NZI Sevens in Wellington – and has some significant names in reserve who may yet feature in the second and third legs of the series.Last year’s Dubai title-winner Ollie Lindsay-Hague and young playmaker Christian Lewis-Pratt complete their rehabilitation from injury shortly. Ryan also has full-timer Simon Hunt, former captain Andy Vilk (Rugby Lions), ex-England U18 wing Sam Edgerley (Esher) and UWIC student Dan Bibby standing by if he needs to make further call-ups for Dubai (December 2-3) or Port Elizabeth (December 9-10).The start of the series will see the squad travel more than 33,000 miles on eight separate flights across a dozen time zones in less than four weeks. The bulk of the 18 games they face will played in temperatures above 30 degrees centigrade. But England – who finished third overall in 2010-11 – have a series of European tournaments behind them and 12 weeks of intense pre-season activity means they are in good shape ahead of their opening pool matches against Scotland, Wales and Tonga.“Selection for the start of the HSBC Sevens World Series has been different because there are three tournaments in a row but it is important to get off to a flying start in Australia and I’m delighted we’ve been able to pick our best available 12,” said Ryan. “They’ve all been capped at international sevens level before and they’re all used to the twists and turns of the tournaments and the travel involved.“We’ve certainly worked very hard off the field – as all our opponents will have done– and we’re excited about the start of the series. We’re looking forward to playing some entertaining rugby and taking our performance levels forward throughout the season.“We face some difficult games with our local rivals in our group. We all know how hard they’ll be to beat and Tonga have beaten us in Australia in the past too. It’s a tough draw but we know what we have to do.”England head for Australia next week and complete the build-up with four days of work in Sydney before travelling to Queensland on November 21. SO KON PO, HONG KONG – MARCH 26: England Sevens coach Ben Ryan during warm up ahead of their match against the USA on day two of the IRB Sevens at Hong Kong Stadium on March 26, 2011 in So Kon Po, Hong Kong. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The HSBC Sevens World Series has expanded to nine tournaments this season with a new stage in Tokyo and new venues in Australia, South Africa – at Port Elizabeth – and the London Sevens at Twickenham on May 12-13 has shifted in the calendar to become the series finale.Tickets are now available for the London Sevens weekend on May 12 and 13 May 2012, with weekend passes starting from £30, single day tickets from £18 and kids tickets at £5 each day.  Visit Ticketmaster.co.uk or call 0844 847 2492.  (Tickets are subject to availability and booking fees apply).last_img read more

‘All change please’ in Scotland

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Edinburgh RugbyGlasgow Warriors Winds of change: Scottish rugby has new personnel key positions, so will it mean improved results?By Alan DymockAS OCTOBER draws near the rain is lashing pedestrians with more regularity. For some south of Berwick this is a reminder that grounds will soften and tries may be unpleasantly scarce. For the Scots it is an unexpected reminder of a successful summer tour and a signal that even more hard work is needed as the seasons shift.Since Andy Robinson arrived in Edinburgh the word ‘change’ has been used more often than in a Barrack Obama campaign commercial. The structure of the SRU has changed. The personnel in charge of Edinburgh Rugby and Glasgow Warriors have changed. The name of the SRU CEO has changed. The language being used at press conferences has, you guessed it, changed. Only the struts of Murrayfield’s roof remain the same dank shade of rust.Of course in season 2011/12 this nationwide change had different effects on the professional teams. Edinburgh were transformed into a fantastic European outfit and a poor RaboDirect Pro12 side. The exact same system fostered a fine Warriors’ Pro12 side with a gritty, if uninspiring, European alter ego.Scotland had a successful Summer tourThe changes also looked to shake the national side right out of its groove. An unprecedented failure of a World Cup was backed up by a stinker of a Six Nations. Losing became as familiar as a Sunday morning sink.Robinson and his bespoke set-up persevered, though. They worked away at it, trying to find the perfect combinations and the right times to introduce the men they had evolved for, in order to cater for their needs.In the summer they took a squad over the equator with more than a few untested names. Railing against form this side flourished. Calling on the defensive principles that made Glasgow feared and the attacking swagger that had made Edinburgh unpredictable, the team swayed to three wins against a sodden Australia, Fiji and Samoa.But still things could not settle. With the country reintroduced to winning on that tour, alteration was again called for by Robinson. Gregor Townsend was brought in at Glasgow to replace the successful Sean Lineen and Neil Back came into Edinburgh to replace Tom Smith as forwards coach.The messages were not subtle: Glasgow was lacking flair and Edinburgh needed grit. They were given coaches of Robinson’s choosing who had a remit to remedy this. Changing is never easy, though, and rarely in sport do the outcomes you want come instantly. So it was no surprise that Glasgow lost their opening two games and failed to win their first ever game at Scotstoun. They were not free-scoring.It was also no surprise that Edinburgh could run pretty patterns, but could not kill off the game in their opening match.However, recently both teams have shown something different. In the last two games Glasgow have turned it on away from home and beaten the champion Ospreys, before scoring freely against Connacht at Scotstoun. Edinburgh, meanwhile, managed to tough out a victory against Cardiff Blues away and kept in touch with an oft rampant Leinster.In the coming months they must both keep this trend going. Obviously they cannot go too far the other way, but with fans now seeing the impact of swapped coaches and more control from Robinson, everyone will want to improve further.It will not be easy. The Heineken Cup is a looming challenge in more ways than one and the EMC Internationals will take players out of the training pool. Reinforcements and new coaches were brought in for these exact reasons.Will both teams revert to type as we squelch into autumn? View of Murrayfield Stadium in Edinburgh on February 25, 2012 on the eve of the rugby union 6 Nations’ match between Scotland and France. AFP PHOTO FRANCK FIFE (Photo credit should read FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images)last_img read more

Referees named for the November Tests

first_imgEngland’s international against Australia (Nov 2)will be overseen by George Clancy, the game against Argentina (Nov 9) will be officiated by Pascal Gauzere and the last game against New Zealand (Nov 16) will be refereed by Craig Joubert.Blowing up: Nigel Owens gets another big game to overseeIreland’s game against Samoa (Nov 9) will be reffed by Steve Walsh, the game against Australia (Nov 16) will be whistled by Chris Pollock and the New Zealand game (Nov 24) will be run by Nigel Owens.Scotland will be overseen by JP Doyle (v Japan, Nov 9), Jerome Garces (v South Africa, Nov 17) and Jaco Peyper (v Australia, Nov 23) and Wales will see their games against South Africa (Nov 9), Argentina (Nov 16), Tonga (Nov 22) and Australia (Nov 30) will be supervised by Alain Rolland, John Lacey, Mike Fraser of NZRU and Wayne Barnes respectively. JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA – OCTOBER 05: Referee Nigel Owens (Wales) during The Rugby Championship match between South Africa and New Zealand at Ellis Park on October 05, 2013 in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by Steve Haag/Gallo Images/Getty Images) Whistling the biggest fixtures: Craig Joubert will officiate the high-profile match between England and New ZealandBy Alan DymockTHE IRB has announced their match official appointments for the upcoming November Tests.With a full schedule for Tier One and Tier Two nations throughout the period, and having concluded a comprehensive study of referee performances through the June Tests and the Rugby Championship, which concluded at the weekend, the IRB have put forward a list of names.Chairman of the selection committee and IRB Council member for Scotland John Jeffrey said: “As always, we have made these selections based on performance and form. Every match is scrutinised by a performance reviewer and, importantly, by the referee himself. Selections are made by taking a close look at a number of key performances.”“In considering the appointments, the committee took the view that the selection criteria should be based on a strategy of selecting the current high-level performers underpinned by a growth philosophy towards having the best match official team available for selection for RWC 2015.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Notably, there are no Scottish referees entrusted with officiating an international match this November, but Marius Mitrea of Italy will oversee Russia versus USA Eagles at Allianz Park, London, on November 23.You can see a full list of the officials and their assistants for the November Tests here.last_img read more

Rugby World Cup 2019 Travel Guide: Kyushu

first_imgTOP TIPIf you plan to travel around, a Kyushu Rail Pass can be used on most trains and is likely to be cheaper than buying tickets for each journey. They cover northern or southern Kyushu or the whole island. TAGS: Japan Discover the beautiful island full of nature and historical sites that will host ten World Cup games Life’s a beach: A sand spa in Kagoshima LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Mixed fare: RamenTOURIST WEBSITEwelcomekyushu.comWORLD CUP VISITThere are three World Cup venues on Kyushu – Fukuoka Hakatanomori Stadium, Kumamoto Stadium and Oita Stadium – and ten matches in all will be played on the island. That means there’s plenty of time to travel around the whole island – Japan’s third largest – and get a taste of the different areas.Related: Rugby World Cup venuesTriple the rugby: Kyushu has three venues including the Fukuoka Hakatanomori StadiumGETTING THEREYou can fly to all three host cities from Tokyo and Osaka – flight times range from 55 minutes to two hours – or you can catch a bullet train from Osaka and Hiroshima.DID YOU KNOW? To coincide with RWC 2019, Kumamoto plans to host a gathering of all the festivals of Kyushu on 28-29 September. Advertising FeatureRugby World Cup 2019 Travel Guide: KyushuSEEThere are varied natural landscapes as well as historical temples and shrines across Kyushu, with certain churches in Nagasaki now designated UNESCO sites.From Fukuoka, you can take a ten-minute ferry to Nokonoshima Island in Hakata Bay, from where you can view the city and take in the smells of flowers in bloom.Off the coast of Nagasaki is Gunkanjima. Once the most densely populated place in the world, housing more than 6,000 people on an island less than one square kilometre in size (as Mitsubishi mined coal), it has been uninhabited for more than 40 years. The James Bond movie Skyfall was filmed there and you can now take a tour.The Aoshima Shrine on the island of Aoshima in Miyazaki is charming – and famed for romantic love in mythology.Float on by: A boat tour of YanagawaDOKyushu has many hot springs, so you can have a unique experience of a sand spa, where your body is buried in the sand, or enjoy river cruising around Yanagawa. Take a tour of Sakurajima to learn about this active volcano and enjoy the waves in Miyazaki, which is a mecca of surfing.EATTry Hakata ramen. It’s noodles, pork, onions and ginger served in a pork-bone broth (tonkotsu) that’s cooked for a long time – and Fukuoka was its birthplace. Kyushu is also known for its Wagyu beef. You’ll find high-quality sake on Kyushu, while shochu, which is made from sweet potatoes or wheat, is also common.last_img read more

Wales equal wins record after beating Italy

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Alan Wyn Jones made his 50th appearance for Wales in the Six Nations. Try time: Josh Adams crosses the line against Italy (Getty Images) Their 26-15 victory over Italy in the Six Nations was far from sparkling, but Wales have now won 11 Test matches in a row His first cap in the tournament came in a loss to Ireland, in Cardiff, in 2007. He has a win percentage of 63% in this competition. He will be relishing the game against England in two weeks.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Italy drew on the try count after getting two score of their own, battering over with Braam Steyn in the first half and darting in to score with Edoardo Padovani out wide in the second. After the match Warren Gatland said that the Italians deserved huge credit for their performance, particularly in defence.There was one other little landmark. Wales equal wins record after beating ItalyWhen you’re hot, you’re hot. Wales’ 26-15 victory over Italy in the second round the 2019 Six Nations means that they have equalled their record for consecutive Test wins, 11.It was hardly sparkling stuff and for the second week in a row the Welsh failed to net a try bonus. However the got the win, and finished Saturday night top of the Six Nations table.The last time Wales won 11 Tests in a row was between 1907 and 1910. But Wales can go one better if they defeat England at the Principality Stadium in round three. The Welsh haven’t beaten England since the 2015 World Cup, but they do have momentum and will look forward to returning home, after two wins on the road.Wales scored one sensational try through centre Owen Watkin – who won the race to score off of Gareth Anscombe’s sensational kick – and another through Worcester wing Josh Adams. They also had potential tries chalked off by the TMO after captain Jonathan Davies slid in but knocked on and then flanker Thomas Young dotted down after receiving a forward pass.But they only had 12 points to show for their first-half efforts, coming from four Dan Biggar penalties.last_img read more

Duhan van der Merwe’s rugby journey

first_img Duhan van der Merwe’s rugby journeyFirst things first, big Duhan van der Merwe, of Edinburgh and Scotland via George in the Western Cape, wants to clear up a few things.That stuff about the origins of his Christian name on Wikipedia? The brilliantly curious claim that he was named after a musician from Limerick called Johnny Duhan? “It’s nonsense, man. I honestly don’t know where these people dream this stuff up.”And his brother, the Sale hooker Akker? “It says he was named after a guy who used to play the clarinet, Acker Bilk. He wasn’t.“It’s funny. We’re reading this and we’re laughing. Some people have great imaginations and way too much time on their hands.”Fine line: Duhan van der Merwe scores his first Test try, against Georgia (Getty Images)Back in October, after three years in Scotland, van der Merwe made his debut for Gregor Townsend’s team with a cap and a try against Georgia. His arrival on the Test scene was keenly anticipated given the regular destruction he has caused in the Guinness Pro14 in recent years – the barnstorming runs, the tries that come in waves.Townsend had been counting the months to his qualification. First chance he got, he put the wing straight in. Van der Merwe scored, carried 11 times and ran for 101 metres. He won a second cap off the bench in the win over Wales in Llanelli, then scored again in his next Test from a brilliant out-to-in line as Scotland defeated Italy. Not a bad start to an international career. “The debut was a very special day for me,” he says. “I’m not usually nervous before a game. I’m usually the one wandering about and making jokes, but I was nervous that day and I was even more nervous when I came on as a substitute against Wales. It’s a different level. You feel it more.“And I knew that everybody back home would be watching. The SRU set me up on a family Zoom call just after the Georgia game and they were all there. They had their faces painted with the Scottish flag, they had the flag hanging up in the living room, my dad was wearing the Scotland jersey. I was so, so proud.”All of this is something of an unlikely story. As a teenager in South Africa, he was a standout, a star of Craven Week two years running, a schoolboy international, a South Africa U20 player. The Scotland wing, who is joining Worcester from Edinbirgh next season, talks Tom English through his unusual route to Test honours Nice touch: Scotland’s Duhan van der Merwe scores against Italy (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In 2014, he came off the bench in the Junior World Cup final in Auckland, an England team captained by Maro Itoje winning 21-20 against a Springbok side led by Handré Pollard. Pollard would get his revenge on Itoje in the senior World Cup final five years later, but by then van der Merwe’s life had changed.Youth centre: Duhan van der Merwe trains with South Africa U20 in 2014 (Getty Images)“I had high expectations of being a full Springbok when I was 18 and 19, but when I hit 20 things weren’t working out the way I wanted them to. I had a lot of injuries that set me back and I found myself stuck in a bit of a rut.“I needed to get away, so I went to France to play for Jake White’s Montpellier, but that didn’t work out either. There were just too many good players ahead of me. I was probably just a nice little player but not tough enough. I didn’t play much but I learnt a lot. That was 2016.”He arrived in Edinburgh in 2017 in poor shape. He’d had a hip injury that required surgery, an ailment that saw him fail his medical. Richard Cockerill gambled on him regardless.“I owe him a big debt. Edinburgh spent a lot of time on me. I just wanted to get the ball in my hands and run, and when I got my injury problems behind me then everything started to come good.“Attacking is my thing and I want to get on the ball more and more. I don’t want single-figure carries in a game, I want double figures.“If I can carry ten times or more then I think I can make a difference. I can’t have games where I touch the ball three or four times, so that’s my target. I want to carry as much as possible. Double figures, no matter who we’re playing against.”He misses the family, of course. Now more than ever. He’d like nothing more than for them to come to Scotland to see him play a Test match in the flesh, but normal life is on hold right now. For his part, he wouldn’t mind nipping back to George for a week. “The heat, man. The heat. It’s 28 or 29 degrees. Gimme seven days of that and I’ll be fine.”As a kid, all he ever wanted to do was play for the Springboks, but it’s funny how life turns out. “It seems like a long time ago when I was dreaming of that,” he says.“The last three years in Edinburgh have been the happiest of my career. I want to get better, I want to stay involved with Scotland and win as many games and caps as I can. I’m a genuinely happy man. Honoured and privileged to be doing what I’m doing. People will look at the residency thing but all I can say is that I’m giving it absolutely everything I’ve got and I’ll keep doing it.” This article originally appeared in the January 2021 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Churches, sacred spaces – easy targets for thieves?

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL February 15, 2012 at 8:34 pm Being in the midst of a somewhat urban neighborhood many people who move up and down the road stop by for coffee, spiritual direction, a bowl of soup, or to simply visit, but sometimes some people take the opportunity to help themselves to parishioners purses, coats, umbrellas, and even smash the windows of cars during the celebration of the Holy Eucharist. The door to our secretary’s office was kicked in and all our petty cash ($30) was stolen and then while we were refurbishing the roof of the church someone climbed the scaffolding erected by the roofers and stole the church’s rooftop speakers and shorted out the entire carillon system costing hundreds upon hundreds of dollars. Now during our worship services we lock all our doors except those coming into the church itself. Not only are we a respite for some we are a crime spree for others. Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Adrian A. Amaya+ says: Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Jonathan Frazier says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Pat McCaughanPosted Feb 15, 2012 Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Comments (2) February 15, 2012 at 5:16 pm This can help prevent your copper downspouts from being stolen: run strong steel cable down the inside, attach at the bottom with an eye-bolt that is sunk in concrete, and attach at the top with two small sections of rebar that are welded into an X or + shape. We had a dozen thefts before this and have had none since. I can send pictures if anyone needs them. [email protected] Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Several stained-glass windows at St. Paul and St. James Church in New Haven, Connecticut, were damaged by vandals during a break-in in 2011. Photo/Ryan DeLoach[Episcopal News Service] Google “church” and “robbery” together and the hits just keep on coming.Recent thefts of copper wiring, mostly from outdoor air conditioning units, as well as other less frequent instances of break-ins, armed robberies and embezzlement, have taught church officials a painful lesson — that even sacred spaces may be easy targets for experienced thieves.The trouble is, many unsuspecting church officials frequently don’t think about security measures, or that they might be victimized, until they are.St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in New Orleans was targeted not once, but twice last year by copper wire thieves, according to the Rev. Steve Craft, rector.“They stole the copper wiring out of the office air conditioning units at first,” Craft said in a recent telephone interview from his office.“When we got to work we thought that the unit needed to be recharged because that happens from time to time. That was a Friday. On Sunday somebody came and said, ‘Do you know the copper piping is missing from the air conditioning unit?’”A week later the thieves returned, this time stealing copper wiring from a school air conditioning unit. “They came back in the middle of the night,” Craft said. “Within a week, we had about $10,000 worth of damage. They even took out the security lamp lighting in the school buildings.”Preschool classes had to be cancelled for more than a week because “you can’t have kids inside in the heat,” Craft said.When local authorities told him that “the amount of money they actually are going to make from this copper was probably about $100 to $150, while it caused $10,000 worth of damage,” he hung a sign that said ‘if you need money, knock on the door, please’.“I’d rather just give somebody the $100 than to go through the hassle again,” he said.Insurance coverage offset some of the losses and the church has undertaken some precautionary measures, such as beefing up lighting around the property and restricting access to the parking lot. They are now fundraising to purchase protective covering for the air conditioning units, but in tough economic times dollars are scarce and the church has yet to recover its previous membership numbers after Hurricane Katrina, Craft acknowledged.He worries the thieves could return again. “It can happen again any day now. We’re just hoping we get everything done before that.”The ordeal amounted to “a whole lot of mess for a little bit of money,” Craft added. “It’s a very sad thing when people feel they have to desecrate a church or any other building, and to cause so much trouble for such a little bit of money. It really is amazing, and not in a good way.”It’s not a problem only in the United States. Metal thefts from air conditioning units are also a challenge for the Church of England, so much so that the Rt. Rev. John Hind, Bishop of Chichester, raised the issue at a Feb. 6 meeting of the House of Lords.Speaking in support of an amendment giving law enforcement officials the right to enter scrap metal yards to determine if metals were obtained illegally, Hind said “in the year from 2010-2011, thefts from churches went up by one-third, resulting in a loss to the church of 4.5 million pounds (roughly $7 million U.S.) in that one year alone.”In January, British Home Secretary Theresa May announced increased penalties for metal theft and the outlaw of cash transactions at scrap metal yards.The Diocese of Manchester welcomed the move. In a statement posted on its website, Anne Sloman, chair of the Church of England’s Cathedral and Church Buildings Council, said: “The Church has campaigned for a long time for legislation to outlaw cash transactions for scrap metal. We are still suffering the theft of lead from ten church roofs a day, and every weapon the Government and the police can use to help us combat this crime is greatly to be welcomed.”Similarly, the Church Insurance Agency Corp., which insures about 86 percent of Episcopal churches for property and casualty coverage, reports that copper theft has quadrupled in the past three years. Thieves frequently target rooftops, gutters, and air conditioning units and, in some cases, new construction, according to spokeswoman Nancy Fisher.Mike Marino, vice president for property and casualty claims said that the agency “will work with churches if they have questions about some sort of risk management prevention.“A lot of churches have brainstormed among themselves and with parishioners about these issues,” Marino said in a recent telephone interview from his office. “For example, on air conditioning units, they contacted maybe a contractor or someone in the parish knows about building fences and units that can make it more difficult or impossible for somebody to just strip it down to get the metal.”The Church Pension Group also offers resources to help congregations assess risk management needs.‘The 4 a.m. call every priest dreads’Similarly, St. Paul and St. James Church in New Haven, Connecticut ramped up security after vandalism and break-ins last year, according to the Rev. Alex Dyer, rector.While a cross was stolen and a candlestick dating back to the early 1900s was taken, Dyer said a troubling aspect of the incident was “that a bible was ripped, all the sacred spaces were disrupted or attacked,” including the stained glass windows, prompting his call for forgiveness for the perpetrator.“I got that 4 a.m. call that every priest dreads. My first thought was, who would rob a church?” recalled Dyer, 32, during a recent telephone interview from his office. “But I guess it is becoming more common.”The church had taken some security precautions to protect office space but not in the sanctuary, he said. “People think that office computers would be a popular target but this church — like a lot of churches — thought, who would dare attack the church? So there were no motion detectors in there.”After his public call for forgiveness, the cross and candlestick were returned. Still, the church consulted a local private security firm and has “since done a huge upgrade to our security system. We put in more motion detectors, contact strips on doors and an upgrade around the church in general. This is the age we live in. It’s unfortunate, but we are trying to be wise as serpents and innocent as doves, to quote Jesus.”Afterwards, he conducted a liturgy from the Book of Occasional Services to restore things profaned, “not a service you want to have to do,” he said. But, Dyer added, while he feels the church is better protected, “no place is really protected. You do what you can, basically, but nothing is perfect.” Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Churches, sacred spaces – easy targets for thieves? Rector Hopkinsville, KY ‘Only as sick as our secrets’A theft at Holy Faith Church in Inglewood, California felt every bit as sinister, but even more painful because the perpetrator was a trusted friend and associate. A parish administrator embezzled about $400,000 from the church over a period of seven years, according to the Rev. Altagracia Perez, rector for the past nine years.“We had most of the usual safety factors in place.” Only one recommendation wasn’t followed to the letter. “We did have staff opening the mail,” she said during a recent telephone interview from her office.Perez said she wanted to go public with the congregation’s experience of embezzlement because she hopes it will encourage others to break what seems to be a code of silence, of shame associated with being victimized.“We’re only as sick as our secrets,” said Perez, adding that when she shared her experience with colleagues throughout the church “there was not one person who didn’t have a similar story. They had either experienced it directly or knew someone who had been through this.”Yet, “nobody wanted to talk about it,” she added. “Even the police, when I went to report what had happened, couldn’t even pretend to be surprised, although they were surprised at the level of complexity involved in our case. They told me that at least once a week a church or nonprofit reports a similar experience.”Holy Faith, which celebrated its centennial anniversary in 2011, had been experiencing ongoing financial struggles, so much so that at one point Perez went unpaid and parishioners upped their contributions to try to balance the church’s books. Yet, “we could never seem to get ahead,” Perez recalled. They later learned it was because a parish administrator, who has been charged and is awaiting trial, had created a false set of books.“His professional experience was in banking, finance and computer systems, which was how he was able to create duplicate bank statements,” she said. Briefly, unbeknownst to Perez or the congregation, the administrator created a separate electronic account in his name and used church funds to pay the balance. When he opened the mail, he created new bank statements that omitted records of those purchases.Eventually the church auditor became suspicious and decided to review “every single paper from an entire year to try to find an explanation for what was happening,” Perez said. He chose the year 2010 and “found one statement of an electronic transmission that we couldn’t explain. There were no receipts, no paper work for it,” she said.“It was insane, it was devastating to the church,” Perez said. “We had been struggling for so long. He had been stealing from the plate, from the investment accounts, from money turned in for gifts, everything.”When confronted, the parish administrator admitted the embezzlement. “He was an active member of the parish, he was involved in everything; people trusted him. When I asked him how he could have done this, he didn’t really understand how he could have done it, either,” she said.A forensic audit followed, with church members stepping up to assist. Now, even more disheartening is that “nothing is being done with the case,” Perez said. It was transferred to the major crimes unit “but we’ve heard nothing. We are trying to find out what happened but nobody’s gotten back to us,” Perez said.Although some money was recovered through insurance and bank policies, it’s been a painful experience and one that Perez is eager for others to avoid, if they can learn from Holy Faith’s experience.“Apparently smaller places get hit more often because they don’t have the human resources or the financial resources to do the extra things to protect people,” she said.“I understand the guilt and shame,” associated with being victimized, she said. “But when I saw how prevalent it is and that nobody is talking about these things, that has to be the reason people get away with it. If people heard what happened in other places it would at least give them a warning of what to look out for, to be careful.”“Vigilance is essential in following established fiduciary practices for the fiscal security of every congregation and church site,” Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop J. Jon Bruno told ENS.“Here in the Diocese of Los Angeles we have proactive procedures in place to assure regular audits and provide professional financial consultation to all congregations and other church organizations. The Inglewood parish situation is a clear reminder to everyone of the importance of following these procedures consistently and thoroughly without exception.”As a result, church leadership is more aware and are optimistic about the future, Perez added. “People feel more ownership in the church and they really do feel better knowing that there was an explanation for everything we were going through.“It’s made a big difference in the morale of the church. There’s a sense of God really working with us and through and being really present in the way that a crisis brings together. It has uncovered gifts and people have been trained to do things they never thought they would be doing.”—The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles.En español: http://bit.ly/A4IonL Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ A lesson learned at gunpointThe Rev. Chad Lawrence, a priest associate at the Parish Church of St. Helena’s in Beaufort, South Carolina learned that lesson at gunpoint.“I was rehearsing my sermon on a Saturday evening last June 25. It was about 8:30 p.m. when I locked up the church, shut off the lights, and began to walk back to my office to get my car keys.”A man jumped out of the bushes near the church, put a gun to Lawrence’s head and threatened to kill him. He took Lawrence’s MP3 player and demanded his wallet and car keys.The thief forced Lawrence into his office to get the wallet and keys, tied him up and “he stood over me and said ‘I want to kill you, right now. Give me three reasons why I shouldn’t kill you. No one would ever see me.’“I said, ‘I have a wife and three children who I love very much. I’m here doing God’s work and if you do kill me, you will have to answer to him,’” replied Lawrence, whose father is Diocese of South Carolina bishop Mark Lawrence.“I was praying the whole time,” recalled Lawrence, 37, during a recent telephone interview from his office. “You begin to wonder, at what point do you begin to struggle back. Then he took an extension cord and hog-tied me, my hands to my feet. He put the gun to my head again and said ‘I’ll be right back’ and he walked out of my office to my car.“At that point, I was inclined to believe he was going to come back,” he recalled. “I learned later that he had put doorstops in every door along the way so they wouldn’t lock behind him.”Lawrence waited about 15 seconds, freed himself and called local police, who responded within minutes. The thief was still in Lawrence’s car but escaped on foot and was not apprehended.St. Helena’s has since reviewed its security measures “making sure we have policies and practices so that we’re not by ourselves in the church area,” Lawrence said. “We put cameras on certain high traffic areas as a deterrent. We also use a magnetic key fob entryway into our main entrance and exit, so that door remains locked the majority of the time. In the past, at night that door was open, left unlocked.”A security expert recommended that staff -including preschool and day-school teachers-not be on the premises late nights or weekends. “We are trying to encourage some general, safe practices,” he said.Consequently, no more late-night sermon practices for Lawrence — not in the church, anyway.He recalled that after the initial shock “of him bursting out of the bushes with a gun, I felt very calm. It was almost a supernatural kind of peace and calmness throughout the entire episode, one that I can’t explain other than to say that I knew God was with me. I knew that if I were to die I would be with him. That wasn’t my hope or my desire, of course. At the same time, I felt very exposed and vulnerable, and in the presence of a real evil.”After cycling through a lot of emotions, “I was able to pray for him,” he said. “The process of losing my wallet and having to go through cancelling credit cards and going to the Department of Motor Vehicles was very annoying and I was angry about that, but I dealt with it. But I look back and I’m grateful that God saw me through and that it turned out the way it did for me.” Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

Majority of South Carolina deputies leave convention in protest

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Fr.Michael Neal says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Marylin Day says: Comments navigation Newer comments By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 11, 2012 Lin Goldstone says: Devon Chambers says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA July 12, 2012 at 11:07 pm See 1 Corinthians 7:12-16 for remarriage after divorce:12 To the rest I say this (I, not the Lord): If any brother has a wife who is not a believer and she is willing to live with him, he must not divorce her. 13 And if a woman has a husband who is not a believer and he is willing to live with her, she must not divorce him. 14 For the unbelieving husband has been sanctified through his wife, and the unbelieving wife has been sanctified through her believing husband. Otherwise your children would be unclean, but as it is, they are holy.15 But if the unbeliever leaves, let it be so. The brother or the sister is not bound in such circumstances; God has called us to live in peace. 16 How do you know, wife, whether you will save your husband? Or, how do you know, husband, whether you will save your wife?As for the Bible supporting and encouraging slavery, 1st century slavery was often voluntary by the slave as a means of surviving poverty. It far more resembled indentured servitude than American blood slavery. Freedom was preferable to slavery but one could serve the Lord as either slave or free and in eternal life there would be no slaves. In this life, in the Lord’s eyes, the slave and free man were equal:1 Corinthians 7:21-24 21 Were you a slave when you were called? Don’t let it trouble you—although if you can gain your freedom, do so. 22 For the one who was a slave when called to faith in the Lord is the Lord’s freed person; similarly, the one who was free when called is Christ’s slave. 23 You were bought at a price; do not become slaves of human beings. 24 Brothers and sisters, each person, as responsible to God, should remain in the situation they were in when God called them. The Rev Gilbert H. Watkins says: Comments are closed. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing July 12, 2012 at 4:03 am How is making a statement that all should be included in the process of ordination no matter how they identify un-Episcopalian? Un-Biblical? I don’t understand. I really don’t understand how a church that takes a stance that all children of God can be ordained if they feel the call is not following the Bible, is not following God, is not following HIS words? I really don’t understand.As N Bonnell pointed out there are things in the Bible that we do not follow. So, is it pick and choose time? If TEC is un-Biblical then so are all churches who don’t follow all the rules. Not one church is Biblical.But the TEC is Biblical, because the Bible is a guide, as someone else said. It was written in a different cultural time, in a different place. I don’t understand all this fighting. It takes too much time and energy. We are all children of God, and would God really have created LGBT folks if He didn’t want them included in His kingdom?What do I know though, I’m not a theologian. I don’t know much. I do know that the God I believe in loves all of us and isn’t exclusive to straight, cisgendered people. The God I believe is loves us all and isn’t exclusive to anyone because He is THAT big, so BIG and loving we can’t even understand.*sigh* South Carolina, I love you. You are a beautiful state. Your beaches have many happy memories, as does that Chattooga River that forms part of the border with GA. I pray for peace for you all, that you can reconcile this decision with grace, and eventually find peace about it deep in your souls. I also pray you don’t leave TEC because we need diversity in our ranks. Nellwyn Beamon says: Dean Stewart says: July 11, 2012 at 11:19 pm The Bible is a living breathing tome that should guide us. Do we believe that every word is true? Did Methuselah really live to be 800 years old? The OT is so violent it would be allowed on tv only after 8pm. We divorce, we don’t stone adulterers. why we even mix fabrics and aren’t killed for it. I eat shellfish. Jesus did not say one word about homosexuality. Paul’s letters are directed to a particular community. The bible is in dialogue with itself and with us. Thank you for staying. Rector Albany, NY Ticia Eaves says: Chris Yaw says: Rector Washington, DC July 12, 2012 at 7:05 am Sixty-six books, 1,100 chapters, more than 30,000 verses . . . a tiny 7 that might reference same gender issues and clearly not the contemporary lives of gay men and women. I cannot understand how the overriding message of the Jesus Christ is not evident and that we have moved beyond slavery, burnt sacrifice, and homophobia. It seems so very evident.If you pick tiny sections of the scripture to support your own bias or misunderstanding, you are probably the ones who have left the faith. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Ian Chamberlin says: General Convention, Rector Bath, NC July 11, 2012 at 11:37 pm Don’t loose heart SC brothers………..TEC is done…………………the majority of the Anglican Communion does not endorse what TEC did or does…….TEC has left the faith…..let us press on.To many souls at stake to let them hinder the mission Christ has given us………………..press on. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Milton Orgeron says: Christopher Myers says: martha knight says: July 14, 2012 at 12:19 am It is so sad that extending the family of God is so repulsive to the deputation and bishop of South Carolina that they chose to take this action. There was neither honor, nor love in their actions, only pride driven by clinging to the delusion of having the power to decide who is entitled to God’s love. They should understand that their actions left a stain of sin and dishonor on an otherwise powerful Convention. While I understand that they feel grief and sorrow at being the minority in a Church that is moving in a different direction they are, there is a definite difference between loyal opposition and flagrant disrespect. The actions of the members of this deputation that left, and their Bishop are of the latter category. The reason I infer this is that the Diocese of South Carolina has not paid its assessments / annual contribution to the Episcopal Church for several years running, and that they are absolutely convinced that their way is the only right way forward. Although they may have left politely, there definitely seems to be a taste of a vulgar action that has been committed. July 12, 2012 at 10:24 am Amen. July 14, 2012 at 6:52 pm You are using the sort of talking points that atheists use to attack the bible:1.) Slavery: the Bible recognizes slavery as an existing social institution, but never says that people *should* have slaves.2.) Burnt sacrifice: something God clearly wanted for the people of ancient Israel, but clearly not preached nor practiced in the New Testament.3. “Homophobia:” a form of nasty name-calling that liberals use to attack people who disagree with them about homosexuality. Extremely un-Christian.Your position seems to be that unless a *lot* of Bible verses were devoted to condemning homosexual relationships, we can ignore the clear import of those that do. But if here *were* a lot, you would dismiss those too. July 11, 2012 at 11:25 pm Since the Diocese of South Carolina has not supported the national church financially for several years, they should not have been given any voice or vote in the first place. They are simply observers of the national church business and their non-participation is anything but a surprise. What they would like to do is to nullify the actions of the General Convention, but the amended language of Resolution AO49 prohibits their bishop from taking any punitive action against lay people, deacons or priests who may support the actions of the Convention (and there are a few). Kathy Tolf says: July 12, 2012 at 1:31 am Following in the steps of Jesus Christ should not be this difficult. An enriching exercise is to ask and then respond to the question: What would Jesus do? This thinking, in my view, is what is driving TEC to follow in HIS footsteps, with all the love, sincerity and gracefulness that is expected of us.One of my favorite parables is the parable of the talents. I think it can apply here. The greatest rewards went to the servants who enriched what was given them to oversee…and the least went to the servant who buried the treasure. The treasure in this case is the scientific knowledge that has been given us. Should we embrace that knowledge? Or bury it? Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Marney L. Pena says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 12, 2012 at 9:38 am This makes me so sad. How can you believe that you are a part of the church when you pick and choose what you want to do within the church? The church is supposed to be a place were all are welcome. This does not show this. I would like to ask these people if they chose who they love? I bet they did not pick who they love. I would also like to ask these people if no one ask you about your sex life then why are you so concerned about what others do in their bedrooms. You need to not only open your hearts but your minds as well. Stop the judgment of others. Be the loving and caring people you claim to be. thomas mauro says: July 16, 2012 at 6:21 pm Declining numbers are seen by almost all Mainline churches. Much of that is simple demographics- the Baby Boom came of age at about the same time that church membership was at its peak, and the graying/decaying of the Boom coincides with the decline in membership you see. Add the lower birthrate of subsequent generations and it is clear that the population of church members is declining in good part by attrition. Consider also that more immigrants today bring their own religion with them, and aren’t interested in attending Christian churches…and you have far fewer people leaving because of “dissatisfaction” than you think.Jesus also consorted with the dregs of society, turned no one away, forgave sinners, embraced untouchables, scolded the establishment for its self-righteousness, and taught that Judgement was not in our purview. So, tell me again…who isn’t following the Word, and who is? Fr.Michael Neal says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Leroy Casterline says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rev. Dr. David Cox says: July 18, 2012 at 12:43 pm Agree… 100% I think we’re letting social popularity and what makes us ‘happy’ is leading down a road that’s not theologically correct. The Bible has this same story over and over again in the Bible and with guidance to refrain from making these mistakes. People are abject to hearing our Lord’s guidance… Hence do any of us as children like what our Father’s have taught us? Typically not at the time but in the future we understand the lessons they were trying to teach. Our sexuality in our society today is broken because we treat it likes its no big deal… another act to make us feel good. But in the end are our acts hurting our hearts and our relationships because the acts are not part of a bigger picture… i.e. the sacrament of marriage which unites a man & woman as woman and ultimatlely conforms us into one unit that is perfect and reflects the union of man/woman and Christ… hence trinity… In my experiences before I felt I got it, I can attest that just having sex because it felt good ultimately left me unfulfilled and often hurt. Marriage is a good thing and to say it’s normal for same sexes to be in that type of sacrament is impossible, and the Bible supports that. m. brooke robertshaw says: Jeremy Bates says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Julian Malakar says: July 13, 2012 at 11:18 am Having not been raised in any religious tradition, when it came time for me to embrace Christ I was free to choose any denomination that felt ‘right’.It is this kind of thinking that first drew me to the Episcopal Church and later to become a confirmed Episcopalian. July 12, 2012 at 9:03 am Twenty little words….yet the message they convey is VOLUMINOUS!!!!!! July 12, 2012 at 10:27 am We will … and so will the other 80% of the Anglican Communion. Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Kieran Conroy says: July 12, 2012 at 3:40 pm Sounds like they’re aiming for the wrong side of history again… The Very Rev. John B. Burwell, deputy of South Carolina, stands up in the House of Deputies on the afternoon of July 11 to tell his fellow deputies that South Carolina is still part of General Convention ENS photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] The majority of the Diocese of South Carolina’s deputies left the General Convention July 11 because, in the words of its remaining clergy deputy, the gathering has passed resolutions that violate the doctrine, discipline and worship of the Episcopal Church.However, that deputy, the Very Rev. John B. Burwell, told Episcopal News Service in an interview after the House of Deputies’ last session of the day that “we are not leaving the Episcopal Church.”In fact, the deputation chose to have him and Deputy Lonnie Hamilton “stay until the bitter end” to make that point.The resolutions concerned are A049, which allows for optional and provisional use of a rite to bless same-gender relationships, and D019 and D002, which affirm the full inclusion of transgender persons in the life of the church (including the ordination process).The blessing resolution, Burwell said, “basically flaunts the canons of the church” because Canon I.2 (b) defines marriage as a “physical and spiritual union of a man and a woman.”“It is not the place of General Convention to be doing that. To top it off, it isn’t biblical. It isn’t biblical,” Burwell said. “Sorry but I can’t get around that, I simply can’t get around it.”The resolution and the rite do not refer to the action allowed as a “marriage.”“Why didn’t we throw out the canon?” Burwell asked. “Let’s be honest about this. If that is the direction that we’d like to head into, then let’s not break laws.”Burwell said he agreed with the sentiments of another deputy during the debate on the gender-identity resolutions who said he longed for the day when people are judged for who they are and not the labels that others give them.However, “it’s unnecessary and it’s unbiblical and it’s un-Anglican” to make the statements made in the two resolutions, he said.Burwell said the deputies cannot agree with the resolutions. We won’t agree with them and they will do damage, not only to South Carolina but also to parts of the Anglican Communion many, many miles from here,” he said.The deputies believe that the resolutions “make fundamental changes to the worship, doctrine and discipline of the Episcopal Church, which we, especially as priests, are sworn to uphold,” Burwell said.“Because of this we simply can’t, as the diocesan deputation, act like nothing has happened,” he added. “This may not be the end of the world, but this is significant and we can’t act like business as usual.”Burwell said the deputies decided after the voting on July 10 to leave, explaining that they thought the convention took a turn that afternoon. Things “went downhill and from our perspective it was a downhill slide. By the end of the evening many in our deputation, many but not all, were demoralized,” he said.The deputies “decided that these resolutions that passed do not represent the Diocese of South Carolina [which] we were deputized to represent and therefore we cannot act like its business as normal and just go about a normal day today like we did yesterday.”Convention observers began to note the absence of South Carolina deputies shortly after the house reconvened for the afternoon at 2:15 p.m. EDT. The deputies posted a short statement on the diocesan website about a half hour later announcing their decision.Burwell insisted that “this was the deputies’ decision, not the bishop’s.”As of 6:50 p.m. July 11, Lawrence was still at convention, he said, despite some reports that he had left.“I know he’s here,” Burwell said. “I do not know how long he’s going to be here.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. July 12, 2012 at 9:08 am I love our inclusive church! Thanks be to God! Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs July 16, 2012 at 11:35 am All churches–even conservative churches–are losing membership. It has nothing to do with the message but with our changing society. Mark James says: July 12, 2012 at 9:20 am Good riddance. I’m sure ACNA, CANA and AMiA will welcome you with open arms. General Convention 2012, Albert Feix III says: Comments navigation Newer comments Rector Smithfield, NC July 12, 2012 at 2:41 pm Anglicanism is not a sola scriptura tradition.Is this news to you? July 13, 2012 at 6:04 am Anglicanism was NOT founded on a divorce. What Henry VIII sought was a declaration that his first marriage was invalid (and later his fourth one likewise), and that was what he eventually obtained. That is still a difference. Kieran Conroy says: Russ Manley says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI July 12, 2012 at 11:59 am I was in one the hearings that preceded the vote in the house of deputies. I am fully supportive of A049, but I was also blessed to see the face of Jesus in my sisters and brothers who are struggling with its passing. I heard real hurt, and true fear, and my heart was full for them. However, I believe the passing of A049 is in fact overwhelmingly biblical insofar as it is the radically inclusive love of Jesus. Somehow we have to find a way to each other. Walking out, or walking away, is not that way. Someone recently preached on the Gospel story when Jesus was asleep in the boat and a great storm had taken over the vessel, the disciples were afraid, but Jesus was right there. This is the Church, It’s a hard place to be, but where else can we be so loved by God that we would be able to struggle together? That is Anglican! This is who we are. I agree with the fellow above who posted that this violates a Canon, therfrore the work of the Church is to change that Canon. No Canon law can ever stand in violation of The heart of Christ. My experience at General Convention totally overwhlemed my heart with a new love for my Church, I don’t want anyone to leave, I want us to struggle in that stormy boat together, Jesus is with us. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bill Hale says: Alda Morgan says: center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ N Bonnell says: July 13, 2012 at 7:21 am Rev. Engelhardt, the annulments were fig leaves, both for Henry and (apparently) for some of us. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel July 12, 2012 at 9:41 am Paul’s letters are indeed addressed to individuals (e.g. Timothy) or communities of individuals (e.g. Romans, Corinthians), does that mean the teachings in those letters only apply to the communities addressed? It seems that you are so implying. Clearly this is not the teaching of the church. Paul’s teachings cannot be discounted with such facility.That we want the teachings of the bible to morph and adapt to our ever-expanding concept of right, doesn’t mean that they do or can. It isn’t for us to adapt the teachings to meet our modern human thoughts and feelings, it is for us to do our best to live as God would have us live.In our human institutions (civil law) we are free to adapt to public will and change our civil laws when right and necessary. But the church isn’t a human institution, it is Christ’s church. We do ourselves (and our Lord and Savior) injustice when we stray from the teachings of Christ. And yes, I include the teachings of the apostles as being from Christ inasmuch as they were personally schooled by Him and executing His charge to them in carrying His church to all the peoples of the world.For those who posit that this is a simple issue revolving around love for one another, do you prayerfully believe that Paul didn’t abide Jesus’ teachings to love one another? If Paul did abide that teaching and still held to his concerns re sexual relations, how is it that we modern people are in a better position than Paul was to know what loving our neighbors means?I can love you and pray for you, I hope you can do the same for me. We are all sinners and fall short and our hope is centered in God’s grace and forgiveness. But we should not convolute Christ’s church to meet our modern concepts of morality, and particularly not to meet America’s bent toward “if it feels good do it.” You are loved best not by those who help you hide your sin, but by those who help you expose it, confess it, and make your peace with God regarding it. James Herndon says: Jeremy Bates says: July 12, 2012 at 8:00 pm James Herdon … You just hit the nail on the head! John Dempsey says: July 12, 2012 at 1:18 am Those who do not believe The Bible, Christianity is not for them. Who do you believe for true image of God, who is truth and spirit? Our own instinct cannot get true image of God in our heart, because we all are sinner. A blind cannot show another blind a way, same way human instinct cannot show path to God. Majority vote could cover the truth as did in case of Christ’s crucifixion where by voice vote “Crucify Him”, our Lord Jesus Christ was convicted.Those who believe, The Bible encourages slavery are wrong. Jews were also slave to Egypt and freed by Moses with direct command by God who separated Red Sea. It is true God blessed those masters who treated their workers as themselves. There were many kind masters, like Abraham who had many slave. Slavery was socio-economic culture in rude form. But comparing slavery and same sex issue is like comparing apple and orange. July 12, 2012 at 12:53 pm I am saddened that this has happened to the church. I believe that anyone who does not believe in the church should leave. My problem is, they believe they can take the property that episcopalians have paid for and supported for over a hundred years.The good thing in America is we all have free will. Those who feel they want to take their ball and go home should just leave.God has made us all. All of us! Would Jesus turn his back on anyone? The answer is NO!God loves all of us.I am positive that there are Gay or Lasbian people in the South Carolina delegation. I am also sure that they have someone in their family that is Gay or a Lasbian. Shame on them. Rector Tampa, FL July 12, 2012 at 3:50 am “Love one another as I have loved you.” It’s as simple as that. It’s not complicated. August 24, 2012 at 12:23 pm Oh ye of no faith. Get thee behind me satan. July 13, 2012 at 2:29 am To the SC Delegation: Thank you for remaining. The church needs to hear your voice along with all the other voices. It is the bread, the cup we share that brings us together and I hope you will continue to share in the table and wine, as we are one in Christ Jesus.I am transgendered. I do not seek a place in the clergy, a lay position or to marry. I am probably that stranger who most will look askance at. Many ignore my presence at best, or actively try to shoo me away or worse. I am usually not welcome and sadly, I’ve learned to pick up on that quickly. I leave as quickly and as quietly as I came in.Yet there was a congregation that gave me an opportunity, an embodiment of these words: “wherever you are in your walk of faith, you are welcome here” . I realize there are some even in my own congregation that ignore my presence, or act as I don’t exist.But there have been many who have welcomed me, not because I’m transgendered, but simply as a fellow traveler in this journey we call life who happens to be transgendered…An Episcopal Congregation welcomed me…not as transgendered, but as a fellow traveler on this walk we call life…and in the walk of faith. I give thanks for being able to join my fellow travelers as one of them…and to share in that bread and wine which unites all who partake.I simply hope the church will continue to “welcome the stranger” and to see them as fellow travelers in this walk we call life. Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Jeremy Bates says: July 13, 2012 at 10:25 pm I don’t accept the Bible as an absolute, locked-in code. There are many progressive changes in theology within the Hebrew Scriptures, and certainly a progressive series of changes in understanding who Jesus was and is. All of the changes were based on experience and revelation. I think our experiences with our GLBT brothers and sisters, and our experience of the love of God in Christ bring us to the realization that the Risen Lord embraces them in his love and we are to honor that. If God loves us and “them” equally, we have to honor that. Our Church in its General Convention acts from the generous love of God and in this acts also very theologically in witness to that love. It is a very great mystery, but the General Convention has acted rightly, justly, and in inclusive openness to all the children of God … at last. The task of the people of the Church is to follow and honor the mystery of the decisions. Even though they may not be “popular” with many, and they may be frought with difficulties and emotional challenges, they do, in the long run bear witness to the love of God. We are always challenged to change toward the right, the good, the merciful, the forgiving, and the loving, no matter what our personal preferences are. I deeply respect the General Convention. It is a mystery, though. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA July 14, 2012 at 6:43 pm I’m afraid the parable of the talents doesn’t reflect well on the current liberal/left leadership of TEC. Rather than drawing people in, they are driving people away. Look at what is happening to membership in TEC (and liberal denominations in general).And I don’t see how “scientific knowledge” can tell us what kinds of behavior are sinful and what are not. That’s a normative question, not a scientific one. Nick Bonnell says: July 13, 2012 at 7:29 pm I was recently baptised in the Episcopal Church at the age of 36. I was drawn to the EC for a a number of reasons, but mainly, as a very liberal Democrat, I knew that I could be a part of the Anglican community, grow in my faith and never, ever feel as though I weren’t being true to myself or my lifelong convictions. For me, and for a lot of other Episcopalians, it comes down to this: Christianity is a religion of/about a person: Jesus Christ. We follow Him, because we believe Him to be God’s Living Word. Not a book, not a man in Italy. Jesus opened his arms to everyone and turned his back on nobody. Period. We should do the same. If we don’t, then how can we possibly call ourselves Christians? For me, it really is that simple. If we are to proclaim that we are all indeed God’s children, then we cannot leave anybody behind. They are our brothers and sisters. Sure, it’s not always easy to accept with open arms those that are different or strange to us. If it were easy, then everyone would do it! But we aren’t “everyone”. We are Episcopalians. We stand for what is right and what is just, even if it makes some people in South Carolina squirm a little. Because, historically speaking, if South Carolinians are squirming, then we must be doing something right. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 John McAdams says: July 12, 2012 at 3:29 pm Amen, Dr. Bourquin. There are so many complicated discussions on these and other issues; but it really is as simple as you suggest. The central themes of love of God and love of neighbor along with the hospitality of God that makes it all possible are clear within scripture from beginning to end. July 11, 2012 at 11:45 pm South Carolina has always loved to be the first to walk out the door, ever since 1860. To those who want a male-only priesthood, a rigid, unbending theology, and no gays allowed, I would call their attention to the sign posted by the exit door: The Catholic Church Welcomes You. Go in peace. Jerry Shea says: July 11, 2012 at 10:02 pm To the SC Delegation-Thanks for staying. If I were in your shoes, and felt my church was doing something fundamentally unbiblical, as you do, I don’t know if I would have acted with such grace. Thanks again, we need your voice. Jeremy Bates says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Dr. Gene Bourquin says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Rev. Al Minor says: Press Release Service Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 12, 2012 at 4:20 pm I am not a clergy nor am I redical fanatic. I try to look at things simply, with God’s guidance. The basic question for me is do I believe homosexuality is a sin or prescribed by God and correspondingly, is union and/or marriage of two persons of the same gender intended by God. My belief is to both points – I do not believe these are actions that are intended by God and therefore, these should not be sanctioned by the church. It does not mean I don’t love homosexuals nor persons of the same sex who live together, but my love for them does not mean I must or should condone there actions. Just as the church and we as Christians, should love and forgive someone who is a murderer, we should not condone the act of murder by not doing so, that does not make us a failure as Christian. As Christ loved and forgave the woman at the well, who was engaged in sexual activity outside of marriage, he instructed her to go and “sin no more” as he did with others throughout the Bible. Loving thy neighbor as thy self does not mean that we must condone actions and/or life styles that are not God’s intended way. Where do we draw the line on what society says we should accept and what our core spiritual teachings and the word of God tells us is acceptable? John McAdams says: Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group July 11, 2012 at 11:13 pm Slavery is in the bible too but we all agree that it is wrong… Submit a Job Listing July 13, 2012 at 6:16 pm I’m not at convention, but have followed this discussion closely. I was saddened to read that the deputation from South Carolina had left Convention, but impressed by subsequent statements from Bp. Lawrence and others. This is action based on conviction and integrity. if you will, it is a form of civil resistance, something most liberals (of which group I am a member) believe in….but only for ourselves?? Moreover, I truly believe that none of us, as followers of Jesus Christ, can….is allowed…to say of brothers and sisters, “Good riddance!”. I don’t agree with the deputies and Bishop of South Carolina on these issues, but I think they are honest in their convictions and have shown careful thought and dignity in their protest. Mr. James, I hope you change your mind about their being good riddance. July 12, 2012 at 8:16 pm In all fairness, I feel its important to note some of the context history and past debates bring to this.In recent books, Brian McLaren “(A New Kind of Chrisitanity”) and the late Peter Gomes (“The Good Book”) both take a very carefullook at the debates around the Bible and slavery in the mid 1800’s and conclude that it was the abolitionists, in fact who were accused of deviating from the Bible and “undermining the foundations of Christianity.” Even many abolitionists acknowledged that they had to support their convictions from the spirit of Christ’s teachings rather than the letter of Scripture, which stood against them in many places. The issue was eventually settled not by Biblical scholarship but the test of history. But for the Christians of the time, it was VERY much seen as an essential issue about the authority of Scripture. (both books I noted above cite some great further reading on this, though I don’t have them handy)Gomes looks similarly at the prohibition movement, with its roots in the Methodist church (which still does not use Communion wine), and how those who pressed for it in hopes of stemming a the grave modern impact of alcoholism on families were accused of “throwing out the Bible.” That issue, of course eventually fell out of our national dialog for the most part, although it remains a live issue for some corners of our own church in Native American communities so impacted by the tragedy alcoholism (A Bishop in the 1980’s gave permission to Lakota Episcopal churches to make their own decision on this one for wine in Communion, I’m not sure what the policy is today).I’m not here to argue one side or the other here; I find debates of this nature are rarely helped by the impersonal medium of the Internet. But I DO strongly feel that I do not have a right to tell anyone they are or are not a Christian because they disagree with my reading of the Bible or my stance on a given social issue. Christ forsaw our grave divisions from the first Communion in John 17, but still prayed for us to be one “by loving one another” as He loves us. For me, that Christian love at minimum requires me to respect the integrity of the faith someone tells me through word and deed that they have in Christ, for that is a sacred thing. We all stand or fall on the grace of God, not the rightness of our arguments.I pray the Holy Spirit will be with the hearts and struggling consciences of ALL Episcopalian Christians in light of these decisions. Jeremy Bates says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 12, 2012 at 9:19 am This saddens me but does not surprise me that South Carolina is balking at the passing of same sex gender blessings. We need your voice as well, but please examine prayerfully those that are estranged from the church as marginal less than human beings. The Rev. Hanns Engelhardt says: July 12, 2012 at 7:14 am Anglicanism was founded on a divorce.So for any Anglican to accuse another of being unbiblical is . . . well, let’s just say that it lacks historical perspective. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Majority of South Carolina deputies leave convention in protest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA July 13, 2012 at 7:25 am Including the Church of Nigeria, which thinks that homosexuality deserves the death penalty. Bruce Marshall says: M Dearborn says: South Carolina Comments (49) July 12, 2012 at 1:27 pm It is no wonder that we are a declining denomination, with such medieval actions!A reminder is needed that we are in 2012 not AD12, our Lord radically brought us up to date and left us to do the same. July 12, 2012 at 10:40 pm So . . . in your view, should the church permit a person who is divorced to re-marry in church?(Just wondering how far this line drawing takes you.) Fr.Michael Neal says: July 12, 2012 at 8:22 pm That sermon image gives me great encouragement, thank you for sharing it. Christ with his Disciples on that “Little Bark on a stormy sea” being an image for the Church is a very ancient reading held by some of Church Fathers. And so needed in our own “stormy times” on the “Ship of Faith.” Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Harvey Cottrell says: last_img read more

Instan a orar por la República Democrática del Congo

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Instan a orar por la República Democrática del Congo Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Huérfanos de Acción Salutífera para el Desarrollo Integral [Action Salutaire pour Development Integrale]/una ONG dirigida por la Iglesia en Goma, con la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori durante su visita en Julio de 2011 a la Iglesia Anglicana del Congo. Foto de Matthew Davies.[Episcopal News Service] La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori se ha unido a otros cristianos a través del mundo en un llamado a una semana de oración —del 26 de noviembre al 2 de diciembre— por la República Democrática del Congo.“Oren por que finalice el conflicto, porque finalice la violencia, porque puedan ser atendidas las necesidades de los que sufren y que pueda prevalecer la paz”, dijo Jefferts Schori en un llamado a la acción el 19 de noviembre, dado a conocer por la Oficina de Relaciones Públicas de la Iglesia Episcopal.La semana de oración ha sido organizada por la Sociedad Misionera de la Iglesia y la Asociación de la Iglesia del Congo, con el respaldo del arzobispo Henri Isingoma de la Iglesia Anglicana del Congo, en respuesta a un incremento reciente de la violencia inducido por un nuevo grupo rebelde, el M23, y varios otros ya existentes.Oraciones y otros materiales pueden descargarse aquí.“Nuestros hermanos anglicanos de la República Democrática del Congo siguen experimentando violencia y desarraigo”, dijo Jefferts Schori, haciendo notar que el aumento de la violencia desde abril ha causado el desplazamiento de 320.000 personas dentro del Congo, y de 60.000 hacia Uganda y Ruanda.La presencia anglicana en el Congo se estableció en 1896 gracias al evangelista ugandés Apolo Kivebulaya. En la actualidad, la provincia incluye aproximadamente medio millón de anglicanos bajo el liderazgo de Isingoma, primado desde 2009.“La obra de la Iglesia Anglicana en el Congo sigue siendo de la más alta calidad y solidaridad, arraigada en el amor del cristiano por su prójimo”, dijo Jefferts Schori, que visitó el Congo Oriental en julio de 2011 y fue testigo de primera mano “del trabajo hecho por la Unión de Madres y otros grupos a favor de los pequeñitos [del Señor]: mujeres, niños y huérfanos, todos ellos víctimas de la violencia de la guerra”.La cobertura de ENS del viaje de la obispa primada en julio de 2011 puede encontrarse aquí.Hora de comida para los niños en un orfanato de la Diócesis de Kivu Norte. Foto de Matthew Davies.La República Democrática del Congo, ex colonia belga, cayó en manos de líderes corruptos y sedientos de poder desde su independencia en 1960. El inmenso país —aproximadamente del mismo tamaño de Europa— enfrentó más de tres décadas de “africanización” y flagrante corrupción bajo la presidencia de Joseph Mobutu, que fue sostenido por Estados Unidos como un “tirano amistoso”  por su resistencia a la Unión Soviética. Los rebeldes dirigidos por Laurent Kabila derrocaron a Mobutu en 1997.Despertando al principio esperanzas de tiempos mejores, Kabila fue instalado como el nuevo presidente y le cambió el nombre al país, de Zaire a República Democrática del Congo. Pero sus aliados se convirtieron en enemigos, y el Congo entró en una guerra brutal que duró cinco años y en la cual se cree que perecieron 5,4 millones de personas. Cuando a Kabila lo asesinaron en 2001, lo sucedió su hijo, Joseph Kabila, que sigue siendo presidente del Congo en un gobierno de poder compartido que incluye a algunos ex rebeldes.La guerra fue alimentada en gran medida por una rebatiña por los vastos recursos minerales del país. Los rebeldes del este, apoyados por las milicias tutsis y por países vecinos como Uganda y Ruanda, combatieron al gobierno con sede en Kinshasa que, a su vez, contaba con el respaldo de las milicias hutus y de Angola, Namibia y Zimbabue. En octubre de 2004, la organización de derechos humanos Amnistía Internacional dio a conocer que se habían reportado 40.000 casos de violaciones en el transcurso de los últimos seis años.Mientras el Congo —en cuyo territorio se encuentra la mayor fuerza para el mantenimiento de la paz de las Naciones Unidas— intenta recobrarse de lo que ha sido llamado el conflicto más sangriento desde la segunda guerra mundial, la actividad rebelde aún enturbia el oriente del país y es sinónima de violencia de género, particularmente en las aldeas rurales. Algunos informes cuentan historias de que los soldados rebeldes violan a mujeres en presencia de sus maridos, y luego matan a los miembros de la familia y llevan a cabo actos de canibalismo.“Muchos millares [de personas] están viviendo con miedo e inseguridad, hambre, enfermedad y pobreza, mientras anhelan regresar a sus hogares y vivir en paz”, dijo Jefferts Schori en su llamado a la acción el 19 de noviembre.Mujeres que han sido víctimas de abusos sexuales por soldados encuentran un seguro asilo en una instalación de la Diócesis de Kivu Norte, donde buscan soluciones a sus traumas y se labran una nueva vida cuyo objetivo final es su reintegración a la sociedad. Foto de Matthew Davies.La Unión de Madres, una organización benéfica cristiana internacional que procura apoyar a las familias en todo el mundo, desempeña un importante papel en atender a mujeres traumatizadas debido a la violencia sexual.La Unión de Mujeres Unidas por la Paz y la Promoción Social (Union des Femmes pour la Paix et la Promotion Social – UFPPS, por su sigla en francés), fundada en Katanga en 2003, ha ampliado la labor de la Unión de Madres para promover y facilitar la participación de las mujeres como mensajeras de la paz y líderes del desarrollo socioeconómico en sus comunidades.La Iglesia Episcopal, mediante su anterior oficina para el ministerio de las mujeres y de Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales, ha respaldado la labor de la UFPPS en tratamientos médicos y psicológicos y de reintegración social en las diócesis de Katanga y Boga.Refiriéndose a la semana de oración, Jefferts Schori dijo: “No puedo imaginar una mejor manera de que el mundo cristiano se prepare para el Advenimiento del Príncipe de la Paz, y espero y ruego que ustedes se unan conmigo durante esta semana que antecede al Adviento”.El llamado a la oración en la página web de la Sociedad Misionera de la Iglesia (CMS por su sigla en inglés) dice: “Esperamos que individuos, agrupaciones e iglesias se comprometerán a orar de nuevo por una solución y el fin definitivo del conflicto, la violencia y las atrocidades, y por una nueva era de paz, así como por las necesidades de todas las personas afectadas”.– Matthew Davies es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Por Matthew DaviesPosted Nov 22, 2012 Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

Fire damages Brooklyn church that is hub for Hurricane Sandy…

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA The Rev. Michael Sniffen stands outside the Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Brooklyn, New York, a major distribution hub for hurricane-relief efforts, during a break between Sunday services on Dec. 9. Photo/Sharon Sheridan[Episcopal News Service] More than 100 firefighters battled an early-morning blaze at a Brooklyn church that has served as a major distribution hub for relief services in New York following the devastation of Hurricane Sandy.“A fire started just after 4 o’clock in the morning [Dec. 23],” the Rev. Michael Sniffen, rector of the Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in the Clinton Hill section of Brooklyn, New York, told ENS. “It appears to be arson. It was started outside the church, like on the steps of the church.”They don’t yet know the extent of the damage, he said during a 10 a.m. telephone interview. While the immediate burn damage appears to be contained to the narthex, they don’t know the extent of water and smoke damage elsewhere. “We have not been able to enter the building yet.”More than 100 firefighters battled the blaze, Sniffen said.The congregation planned to hold its 11 a.m. Advent 4 service at Brown Memorial Church, a Baptist church located around the corner. They don’t know yet about Christmas services, Sniffen said. “It’s going to depend on whether or not they can restore power to the building.”Several surrounding churches already have offered the congregation worship space for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, he said.Boxes of donated relief supplies lined the sides of the sanctuary of the Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Brooklyn, New York, on Dec. 9. The church has been a relief hub for Hurricane Sandy donations, which are sorted and organized in the church and then sent where needed elsewhere in New York. A fire damaged the church on Dec. 23, but the extent of damage to the building and the relief supplies is still unknown. Photo/Sharon SheridanIn the weeks after Hurricane Sandy, the church has provided a hub for Occupy Sandy, a grassroots relief effort spearheaded by members of the Occupy Movement. By Nov. 12, more than 20,000 volunteers had been trained and deployed, and hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of donations had been received and processed.Sniffen supported the Occupy Wall Street participants when the movement began with the occupation of Zuccotti Park in Manhattan. He was arrested along with George Packard, former Episcopal bishop suffragan for armed services and federal ministries, the Rev. John Merz, also of Brooklyn, and the Rev. Earl Kooperkamp, then rector of a Harlem church, during a protest in December 2011.Sniffen said he didn’t know whether the suspected arson related to the church’s Occupy Sandy work. “I don’t think there’s any connection, but there’s really no way to know at this point.”“Thank God we had two volunteers in the building who have been doing security for us,” he added. “If they hadn’t smelled the smoke, the fire could have consumed the whole church. It’s not like anybody was around to see it.”“This church burned twice and came back stronger each time, so we’re undeterred,” Sniffen said. “It’s obviously very sad to have a fire in your church two days before Christmas, but Jesus had no home so … [He’s] got a home in our hearts.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Fire damages Brooklyn church that is hub for Hurricane Sandy relief Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Sharon SheridanPosted Dec 23, 2012 Hurricane Sandy Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more