Aspiring attorney loses law schools’ challenge at CCJ

first_imgThe legal challenge alleging that the Law Schools’ admissions process discriminates against holders of non-University of the West Indies (UWI) law degrees was dismissed on Friday in a judgement delivered at the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ).The Council of Legal Education was established in 1971 by the Agreement Establishing the Council of Legal Education and operates three law schools in the Region – the Norman Manley Law School, the Hugh Wooding Law School and the Eugene Dupuch Law School.These law schools award a Legal Education Certificate and the Agreement provides that no person can be admitted in the signatory countries to practice asJason Jonesan Attorney who does not hold this certificate.However in July 2018, Jason Jones filed an application for special leave against the Council of Legal Education (CLE), the Council for Social and Human Development (COHSOD), and the Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED).Jones, a national of Trinidad and Tobago, holds a Bachelor of Laws degree from the University of London, a Master of Laws in Oil and Gas Law, and a Graduate Diploma in Law. In 2015 and 2016 he, sat the law schools’ entrance examinations but was unsuccessful on both attempts. He paid the requisite fees for the examination in 2017 but did not sit the exam, as he stated that he was “too disenchanted and discouraged with the entire process”.Jones contended that the proposed defendants have infringed, and continue to infringe, his rights and benefits under the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas which speaks to the free movement of skilled nationals and acceptance of qualification among member states, because, without a Legal Education Certificate, he is not entitled to practice law in the region.In its decision on Friday, the CCJ considered the objection raised that the Court had no jurisdiction over the CLE. It noted that the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas, which was made in 2001, after the Agreement establishing the Council, makes no mention of the CLE or the Agreement.Furthermore, the Court noted that the CLE was not a principal organ of the Community and that it did not even enjoy the status of an institution or associated institution of the Community and as such proceedings could not be commenced against the CLE as an institution of Community.In view of these considerations, the Court dismissed the present application for special leave but left it open for the applicant to decide whether, and how, to seek the redress he claims.last_img read more

Iraq shootings cause more controversy

first_imgIn its statement, Unity Resources said that according to its initial information, the car had approached the convoy “at speed” and failed to stop in response to hand signals and a warning flare. “Finally shots were fired at the vehicle and it stopped,” the company said. The episode’s connection with the U.S. Agency for International Development is one of several parallels to the Sept. 16 shootings, in which the Iraqi government says 17 Iraqis died and 27 were injured. The Sept. 16 episode began when a convoy operated by Blackwater USA, an American private security company hired to protect the aid agency’s officials, entered Nisour Square in central Baghdad and fired several bullets toward a car the guards apparently considered a threat. In Tuesday’s shooting, like the one on Sept. 16, the car drifted forward after the initial burst, prompting guards to unleash a barrage of gunfire. And there were no government officials or policy experts in either of the convoys: The Nisour Square convoy was controlling traffic as part of a larger operation, and the convoy in Karada was on a routine movement that involved only security guards, according to American officials. Although the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad has said almost nothing about the Nisour Square episode while an American investigation grinds on, the Iraqi government has said its own investigation concluded that the shootings were an act of “deliberate murder” and called on the Blackwater guards to be prosecuted. Ali Jafar, a traffic policeman posted near the Karada shooting, said he thought the similarities between the two cases were undeniable. “They are killing the people just like what happened in Nisour Square,” Jafar said. “They are butchering the Iraqis.” The new shootings happened at an extremely difficult time for the State Department, which relies heavily on Blackwater to protect its diplomats whenever they work outside the fortified Green Zone. As a result of new restrictions placed on Blackwater after the Nisour Square shootings, the State Department’s numerous programs for rebuilding Iraqi government and technical institutions have been seriously hampered. Embassy officials have vowed to continue their operations even as they increase oversight of Blackwater operations.. Tuesday, the convoy of white SUVs was stopped in the eastbound lane of Karada Street at an intersection with an alley lined with low concrete homes, witnesses said. A man who works at a plumbing shop, who gave his name only as Muhammad, said the Oldsmobile was approaching the convoy from behind. He said he heard no warnings. “They shot from the back door,” he said. “The door opened and they fired.” Two witnesses said they heard a single shot first, which apparently punctured the Oldsmobile’s radiator, spilling coolant onto the street about 50 yards from where the convoy was parked. As the car continued rolling, the guards opened up with a barrage of sustained automatic fire. The car finally came to a stop about 10 yards from the convoy at a point that, three hours later, was marked by blood stains, broken glass and tufts of brown hair. The plumber said the convoy moved out right away, without checking to see what damage had been done or to offer medical help. The Oldsmobile was towed to a nearby police station. The priest and relatives near the scene identified the driver as Maruni Uhanees, 59, and the dead passenger as Jeniva Jalal, 30. As twilight set in, Armenian family members gathered beside the car in a dirt alley outside the police station, staring at the blood and hair on the inside of the windshield. A brother-in-law of the driver, Hrair Vartanian, said Uhanees was the mother of three grown daughters. As he spoke, one of the daughters arrived and looked at the bloodstains, crying softly.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! BAGHDAD – Two women died here Tuesday when their white Oldsmobile was riddled by automatic gunfire from private security guards, just weeks after a similar shooting that strained relations between the United States and Iraq. The guards in Tuesday’s shooting were linked to the same United States government agency whose security agents sprayed bullets across a crowded Baghdad square in September, an episode that caused an uproar among Iraqi officials and is still being investigated by the United States. On Tuesday, as many as 40 bullets struck the car, killing the driver and the woman in the front seat on the passenger side. A woman and a boy in the back seat survived, according to witnesses and local police officials in the Karada neighborhood, where the shooting took place on a boulevard lined with appliance stores, tea shops and money changers. American government officials said the guards had been hired to protect financial and policy experts working for an organization under contract with the U.S. Agency for International Development, a quasi-independent State Department agency that does extensive aid work in Iraq. The organization, RTI International, is in Iraq to carry out what is ultimately a State Department effort to improve local government and democratic institutions. But a Bush administration official said that the State Department bore no responsibility to oversee RTI’s security operations. “AID does not direct the security arrangements of its contractors,” the official said. “These groups are contractually responsible for the safety and security of their employees. That responsibility falls entirely on the contractor.” A priest and relatives near the scene said all of the people in the car were Armenian Christians, who make up a small minority group in Iraq. The Oldsmobile was shot once in the radiator, witnesses said, in front of a plumbing supply store as it approached a convoy of white sport utility vehicles 50 yards away. As the car kept rolling, a barrage of gunfire suddenly tore through the hood, roof and windshield and the passenger side of the vehicle. The guards who were in the convoy work for Unity Resources Group, an Australian-run security firm that has its headquarters in Dubai and is registered in Singapore, according to a statement by the company. Unity Resources was hired by RTI to provide security in Iraq. last_img read more